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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Ransom's division at Fredericksburg. (search)
s and Willis's hills. General Ransom advanced Cooke's brigade to the top of the hill, and placed htroops, and almost at the same moment Brigadier-General Cooke was borne from the field severely wou 13th, Brigadier-Generals Ransom, Kershaw, and Cooke (severely wounded). General McLaws was notcontaining the 24th, 25th, 35th, and 49th; and Cooke's, the 15th, 27th, 46th, and 48th regiments,--hed to my brigade was Branch's battery, and to Cooke's brigade the battery of Cooper. At the tim on Anderson if you want help. I brought up Cooke before the first assault to the crest of the hill, and before that assault ended Cooke took the 27th and the 46th and part of the 15th North Caro position shoulder to shoulder with Cobb's and Cooke's men in the road. During this third attacksame instant, and within two paces of him, General Cooke was severely wounded and borne from the fiHall, 46th North Carolina, assuming command of Cooke's brigade. At this juncture I sent my adjut
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A hot day on Marye's Heights. (search)
e bullets of the infantry in the road, and fell back in great confusion. Spotting the fields in our front, we could detect little patches of blue — the dead and wounded of the Federal infantry who had fallen facing the very muzzles of our guns. Cooke's brigade of Ransom's division was now placed in the sunken road with Cobb's men. At 2 P. M. other columns of the enemy left the crest and advanced to the attack; it appeared to us that there was no end of them. On they came in beautiful array aolley at the enemy at close range, and then at the command Forward! dashed down the hill. It left dead men on Miller's redoubt, and he had to drag them away from the muzzles of his guns. At this time General Cobb fell mortally wounded, and General Cooke was borne from the field, also wounded. Among other missiles a 3-inch rifle-ball came crashing through the works and fell at our feet. Kursheedt picked it up and said, Boys, let's send this back to them again ; and into the gun it went, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
t. Master E. Sells (receiving ship); Great Western, (ordnance boat), Act. V. Lieut. W. F. Hamilton; Judge Torrence, (ordnance boat), Act. V. Lieut. J. F. Richardson; New National, Act. Master A. M. Grant (receiving ship), 1 howitzer; Red Rover, Act. Master W. R. Wells (hospital steamer), 1 gun; Sovereign (storeship, no battery), Act. Master T. Baldwin; William H. Brown (dispatch steamer), Act. V. Lieut. J. A. French. West Gulf squadron: Passage of Port Hudson, March 14th-15th, 1863.--Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut commanding; Capt. Thornton A. Jenkins, Fleet Captain. Hartford (flag-ship), Capt. James S. Palmer; Mississippi, Capt. Melancton Smith; Monongahela, Capt. J. P. McKinstry; Richmond, Com. James Alden; Genesee, Com. W. H. Macomb; Albatross, Lieut.-Com. John E. Hart: Kineo, Lieut.-Com. John Watters. Cooperating vessels of West Gulf Squadron, in Red River, May, 1863: Albatross, Lieut.-Com. John E. Hart; Estrella, Lieut.-Com. A. P. Cooke; Arizona, Act. V. Lieut. Daniel P. Upton.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The capture of Port Hudson. (search)
ates to destroy the gun-boat Cotton, and took 50 prisoners, with a loss of 6 killed and 27 wounded. Among the dead was Buchanan, who was succeeded by Lieutenant-Commander A. P. Cooke. Magruder's men boarding the Harriet Lane at Galveston. See previous page. After providing for the garrisons and the secure defense of New Oed many prisoners on the march. Their gun-boats came down the Atchafalaya too late to dispute Grover's landing, were defeated by our flotilla, under Lieutenant-Commander A. P. Cooke, and the Queen of the West was destroyed. On the 20th Butte-à--la-Rose, with sixty men and two heavy guns, surrendered to Cooke, and the same day BaCooke, and the same day Banks occupied Opelousas. Here he received his first communication from General Grant, dated before Vicksburg, March 23d, and sent through Admiral Farragut. This opened a correspondence, the practical effect of which was to cause General Banks to conform his movements to the expectation that General Grant would send an army corps