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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
is, Admiral Porter offered to go up himself with the force he had, and started accordingly on the 4th with the above-named vessels, arriving at Fort De Russy on the 5th. On the way up he met the two gun-boats returning, their commanding officer (Cooke) informing Admiral Porter that his wheel had been disabled by a shell from Fort De Russy; the other vessel was struck, but there was no one hurt. As the vessels were light, Lieutenant-Commander Cooke could do nothing against the enemy. The AdmiLieutenant-Commander Cooke could do nothing against the enemy. The Admiral directed him to return with him, as he should need his vessels, and shortly after took possession of Fort De Russy. It was a strong work, with three casemated guns and a flanking battery nearly at right angles, calculated to mount seven more guns. Now, be it remembered, the Navy took possession of Fort De Russy--no very important event — on the morning of May 5, 1863, while General Banks only started on that day from Opelousas, distant, he says, from Alexandria, one hundred miles; yet he