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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Rogers Cooke or search for John Rogers Cooke in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
2th of May, but his claim was never recognized by Generals Lee and Early. He claimed two pieces of artillery captured by Cooke's, McRae's, and Lane's brigades in their glorious charge upon Hancock's entrenchments at Reames' Station, but General A. , Cook's, Cox's and Grimes' Brigades)1,823 —— 4,465 Third corps. Corps Headquarters, &c149 Heth's Division (Cooke's, Davis', McComb's and McRae's Brigades) 1,571 Mahone's Division (Finegan's, Forney's, Harris', Sorel's, Weisiger's Bri24th, as Pollard relates, his brigades (Lane's and McGowan's) behaved most disgracefully, and were replaced by Davis' and Cooke's troops of Heth's division. On page 522, in the biography of General Field, of Virginia, the historian relates that h24th, as Pollard relates, his brigades (Lane's and McGowan's) behaved most disgracefully and were replaced by Davis's and Cooke's troops, of Heth's division. The Thirty-seventh regiment alone of my brigade behaved badly on that occasion; but in jus<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
ay or are pretermitted in the calm of never-ending repose; Colonel William L. Saunders, for twelve years Secretary of State of North Corolina, the capable editor of the Colonial Records of that Commonwealth, and a gallant officer; Brigadier-General Lucius J. Gartrell, of Georgia, an eloquent advocate and an ex-member of Confederate Congress; Colonel Daniel G. Fowle, a true Confederate, and, at the time of his sudden death, occupying the gubernatorial chair of North Carolina; and Brigadier-General John R. Cooke, of Missouri, accredited by official appointment to the Old North State, have all succumbed to the attack of the Black Knight with visor down, whose onset none may successfully resist. On the second day succeeding the delivery of this address, April 29th, Brigadier-General Armistead Lindsay Long, late Chief of Artillery of the Second Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia, and the military biographer of General Robert E. Lee, Crossed the river, and rested with his immortal Ch
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Burkett Davenport Fry. (search)
e lieutenant-colonel of the Virginia regiment, and on the sudden death of Colonel Fry at Will's Creek, May 31, 1754, succeeded to the command. The Rev. Henry Fry, the second son of Colonel Joshua Fry, a man of attainments and of pious usefulness, married Susan, the daughter of Dr. Thomas Walker, the pioneer explorer of Kentucky, and his wife Mildred (Thornton), widow of Nicholas Meriwether. These progenitors number among their descendants the worthy names of Bell, Bullitt, Cabell, Coles, Cooke, Gilmer, Green, Lewis, McDonald, Morton, Maury, Maupin, Slaughter, Speed, and others. Thornton Fry, son of Rev. Henry Fry, married Eliza R., daughter of Hon. Philip Rootes Thompson, of Culpeper county, and member of Congress 1801-1807. These were the parents of Burkett Davenport Fry, who was born in Culpeper county June 24, 1822. The troubles with Mexico enlisted his eager patriotism, and he was appointed first lieutenant of United States voltigeurs February 24, 1847. He was promoted t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General John Rogers Cooke. (search)
ithily characterized as upright, downright General Cooke—memorial is merited. With a nature whose United States Army, who is still alive. John Rogers Cooke was graduated from Harvard University as dauntless intrepidity and the achievements of Cooke's Brigade have reflected a lustre upon the Noreneral Lee finally gave the order for attack. Cooke's men were in the Courthouse yard, Standinot lead my men while I am here! rejoined General Cooke as he threw himself into the saddle. Plache defence. General Lee's high opinion of General Cooke and his command is best illustrated in a ggadier on the lines in front of Richmond. General Cooke was in his tent suffering from his wounds as directed by the engineers. No, replied General Cooke, impatiently, and I don't believe they eveal Lee rode off, followed by his staff and General Cooke. An inspection of the line showed that atthe following tribute: The death of General John R. Cooke recalls a splendid achievement of the [10 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 33 (search)
ville, N. C., August 25, 1890. See Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume X, page 59, and Volume XV, page 359. To General James H. Lane, Auburn, Ala.: * * * The Seventh North Carolina regiment left Petersburg at midnight on the 26th February, 1865; went to Randolph county, N. C., and was quite successfully engaged in arresting and returning absentees to their commands, until called to meet Stoneman, then threatening the railroad from Salisbury to Danville. On Sunday, April 16, 1865, Cooke's and Lane's detachments (Seventh and Forty-sixth North Carolina regiments), Lieutenant-Colonel A. C. McAllister commanding, reported to General D. H. Hill, Lee's corps, army of Tennessee, and surrendered with them near Greensboroa, N. C. On the 29th we turned over four-fifths of the arms, retaining one-fifth. Officers were allowed their side-arms. Thirteen (13) commissioned officers and one hundred and thirty-nine (139) enlisted men belonging to the Seventh were paroled on 1st May, 1865.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
te Survivors' Association, Augusta, Ga., 92. Confederate Veterans, United, 2d Anniversary of organization of, 289; Committee of to aid the indigent, 291. Cooke, Gen. John R., Death of, 94; Biographical sketch of, 322. Cooke, Gen. Philip St. George, 323. Corwin, Hon., Thomas, Taken to be a negro, 49. Couch, Gen. DCooke, Gen. Philip St. George, 323. Corwin, Hon., Thomas, Taken to be a negro, 49. Couch, Gen. D. N., 66. Cox, Gen. W. R., Address on the Life and Character of Gen. S. D. Ramseur, 217. Crater, Battle of the, Address by Geo. S. Bernard, 3; loss of Federals at, 21; relative forces of Federals and Confederates there, 26, 27. Crawford, Col. W. P., Death of, 93. Crew's House, 57. Cutshaw, Col. W. E., Battalion of Artnited States War Records office, 364. Valley of Virginia, Campaign in 1864, 80, 243. Vance, Gov. Z. B., 407. Venable, Col. Charles S.,4; his tribute to Gen. John R. Cooke, 325. Walker's Nicaragua Expedition, 287. Walker, Gen., R. Lindsay, Death of, 93. Walker, Dr., Thomas, The Kentucky pioneer, 288. Walthall, Hon.