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James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 22 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 20 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 18 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
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William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 1: his early years and first employment as a compositor (search)
bout dress, which was a personal characteristic in after-life, and which he was sometimes accused of cultivating with a view to effect, In his controversy with Cooper, the novelist, over the latter's libel suits, in the early days of the Tribune, Greeley printed a report of an imaginary argument by Cooper in court, in which he Cooper in court, in which he made Cooper thus allude to his appearance: Fenimore-Well, then, your Honor, I offer to prove by this witness that the plaintiff is tow-headed, and half bald at that; he is long-legged, gaunt, and most cadaverous of visage-ergo, homely.... I have evidence to prove the said plaintiff slouching in dress; goes bent like a hoop, and soCooper thus allude to his appearance: Fenimore-Well, then, your Honor, I offer to prove by this witness that the plaintiff is tow-headed, and half bald at that; he is long-legged, gaunt, and most cadaverous of visage-ergo, homely.... I have evidence to prove the said plaintiff slouching in dress; goes bent like a hoop, and so rocking in gait that he walks on both sides of the street at once. When, in 1844, Colonel James Watson Webb, in the Courier and Enquirer, accused Greeley of seeking notoriety by his oddity in dress, the Tribune retorted that its editor had been dressed better than any of his assailants could be if they paid their debts, adding
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 4: the founding of the New York Tribune (search)
ning Post.) During its first year the Tribune published a letter on the trial of the suit for libel brought by J. Fenimore Cooper against Thurlow Weed, in which the novelist secured a verdict of $400. The writer of this letter remarked: The value of Mr. Cooper's character, therefore, has been judicially ascertained. It is worth exactly $400. This led Cooper to sue Greeley for libel, and the trial took place in Saratoga, in December, 1842. Greeley argued his own case, and the jury gave thCooper to sue Greeley for libel, and the trial took place in Saratoga, in December, 1842. Greeley argued his own case, and the jury gave the plaintiff a verdict for $200. As soon as this result was announced, Greeley took a sleigh for Troy, where he caught a boat, and early the next morning he was at his desk writing his own report of the trial. This report, which filled twelve columns of the Tribune of December 12, 1842, he finished by 11 P. M.--the best single day's work I ever did. Cooper made this report the ground for another libel suit, but that suit never came to trial. A young newspaper can secure no advertising more
xas annexation, 142; Compromise of 1850, 151-163. Cochran, John, nominated for Vice-President, 199. Coggeshall, James, loan to Greeley, 59. Compromise of 1850,151-163. Congdon, C. T., 72. Constitutionalist, Greeley's work for, 26. Cooper libel suits, 11, 68. Crandall, Miss, opposition to her plan for negro education, 132. Curtis, George William, 72. D. Dallas, vote on tariff, 121. Dana, Charles A., 72, 82, 105. Davis, Judge, David, candidate for presidential nominlan of the Tribune, 58, 60; Harrison's death, 60, birth and early struggles of the Tribune, 61; partnership with McElrath, 62; on Henry J. Raymond, 64; labor on the Tribune, 65, 69; views of the stage, 65; use of epithets, 67, 154 note; report of Cooper libel suit, 68; newspaper versatility, 71; associates, 72; value of his isms to the Tribune, 76; his view of Independent thinking, 76-78, 83,146; refusal to be guided by Weed, 78; early sympathy with socialism, 79; support of Brisbane's Fourieri
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Standard and popular Library books, selected from the catalogue of Houghton, Mifflin and Co. (search)
dley Warner. Washington Irving. By Charles Dudley Warner. 16mo, $1.25. Noah Webster. By Horace E. Scudder. 16mo, $1.25. Henry D. Thoreau. By Frank B. Sanborn. 16mo, $1.25. George Ripley. By 0. B. Frothingham. 16mo, $1.25. J. Fenimore Cooper. By Prof. T. R. Lounsbury. (In Preparation.) Nathaniel Hawthorne. By James Russell Lowell. N. P. Willis. By Thomas Bailey Aldrich. William Gilmore Simms. By George W. Cable. Benjamin Franklin. By T. W. Higginson. Others$r.50. L. Maria Child. Looking toward Sunset. 4to, $2.50. James Freeman Clarke. Ten Great Religions. 8vo, $3.00. Common Sense in Religion. 12mo, $2.00. Memorial and Biographical Sketches. 12mo, $2.00. Exotics. $1.00. J. Fenimore Cooper. Works. Household Edition. Illustrated. 32 vols. 16mo. Cloth, per volume, $1.00; the set, $32.00. Globe Edition. Illust'd. 6 vols. $20.00. (Sold only insets.) Sea Tales. Illustrated. 10 vols. 16mo, $Io.00. Leather Stocking T
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
olds of Dr. Johnson and Garrick, which have been perpetuated by so many thousand engravings. How strange it seems to me to sit at table and look upon such productions, so time-hallowed, and so full of the richest associations! You must see that I write blindly on; a mere word, which I chance to hit upon, suggesting the next topic. The word associations brings to my mind Westminster Abbey. Books and descriptions will not let one realize the sweeping interests of this hallowed place. . . . Cooper and Willis have harmed us not a little; and then some others of our countrymen, who have not been so extensively received in society as these two, and who have written nothing, have yet left impressions not the most agreeable. A friend told me yesterday what Rogers said the other day to him: The Americans I have seen have been generally very agreeable and accomplished men; but there is too much of them: they take up too much of our time. This was delivered with the greatest gentleness. . .
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
II. pp. 223-277, Political Affairs. at the end is by Croker. I have just read an article on Lockhart's Scott, written by Cooper, in the Knickerbocker, which was lent me by Barry Cornwall. I think it capital. I see none of Cooper's faults; and I thCooper's faults; and I think a proper castigation is applied to the vulgar minds of Scott and Lockhart. Indeed, the nearer I approach the circle of these men the less disposed do I find myself to like them. Scott is not sans reproche; and Lockhart seems without a friend. thought if he could live life over again he would be a gardener. He spoke with bitterness of Lockhart, and concurred in Cooper's article on his Life of Scott. He said that he himself had been soundly abused in Blackwood and the Quarterly for his L the size of Charles G. Loring. Ante,Vol. I. p. 135. After him come the Solicitor-General, Knight Bruce, Wigram, Jacob, Cooper, &c. I should like to close this series of hasty sketches by some general comparison of the Bench and Bar in England and
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
ntains the ridiculous remarks on the United States, is by Sir Francis Head; and the political article Jan. 1839, Vol. LXIII. pp. 223-277, Political Affairs. at the end is by Croker. I have just read an article on Lockhart's Scott, written by Cooper, in the Knickerbocker, which was lent me by Barry Cornwall. I think it capital. I see none of Cooper's faults; and I think a proper castigation is applied to the vulgar minds of Scott and Lockhart. Indeed, the nearer I approach the circle of tCooper's faults; and I think a proper castigation is applied to the vulgar minds of Scott and Lockhart. Indeed, the nearer I approach the circle of these men the less disposed do I find myself to like them. Scott is not sans reproche; and Lockhart seems without a friend. Of course, I see the latter often. Sometimes we shake hands when we meet, and sometimes not. When last I saw him, he gave me a radiant smile. Since I last wrote I have, as before, been in a constant succession of parties of different kinds. Some of the most interesting to you have been with Senior, Talfourd, and Lord Durham. At Senior's I met most of the Radical M. P
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
spent in the toilsome study of abstracts of titles; and when I saw him last Sunday, at his house, he was poring over one which press of business had compelled him to take home. He is a small, thin man, with a very dull countenance, in which, nevertheless,— knowing what he has written,—I can detect the poetical frenzy. His manner is gentle and quiet, and his voice low. He thought if he could live life over again he would be a gardener. He spoke with bitterness of Lockhart, and concurred in Cooper's article on his Life of Scott. He said that he himself had been soundly abused in Blackwood and the Quarterly for his Life of Kean and his editing Willis,—though they had formerly administered a great deal of praise. He had not, however, read their articles; but spoke of them according to what he had heard. Airs. Procter is a sweet person; she is the daughter of my friend, Mrs. Basil Montagu, and has munch of her mother's information and intelligence. There is no place that I enjoy more<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
and let the work be exhibited in America, and his way will be clear. Orders will then come upon him as fast as he can attend to them. This, you will understand, is predicated upon my confidence in his ability. It was the case with Greenough. Cooper saw him, was pleased with him, and gave him an order for his bust; this he executed finely. Cooper then ordered a group, which was the Chanting Cherubs, and gave Greenough the privilege of exhibiting it in the principal cities. From that momentCooper then ordered a group, which was the Chanting Cherubs, and gave Greenough the privilege of exhibiting it in the principal cities. From that moment his success was complete. Before, he had been living as he could; not long after, he was able to keep his carriage. Let me suggest, seriatim,some of the ways in which you and others may contribute to put Crawford in the same position. . . . I am sorry to trouble you so much, my dear Hillard, but I can do nothing at this distance but give my friends trouble. In the matter of this letter I feel a sincere interest, because the artist is young, amiable, and poor; and, benefiting him, you will b
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
esidential horizon. In all my meditations I revert with new regret to the attempted reconciliation in 1849 in your State. Without that we should now control the free States. I read carefully and enjoyed much Mr. Bryant's address. On J. Fenimore Cooper, Feb. 25, 1852, at a meeting of which Mr. Webster was chairman, called to raise funds for a monument to the novelist. Sumner's reply to the invitation to attend the meeting is printed in his Works, vol. III. p. 43. It was a truthful, simple, and delicate composition, and, much as I value sculpture and Greenough, I cannot but add will be a more durable monument to Cooper than any other. Webster's historical article was crude and trite enough. George Sumner arrived home, April 19, 1852, after a continuous sojourn in Europe since 1838. His coming had been eagerly awaited by Charles, who had deplored his long lingering in Europe. The two brothers had not met for fifteen years. When they parted they were both little known to t
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