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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 90 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 54 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 3 1 Browse Search
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States. You can also browse the collection for James Fenimore Cooper or search for James Fenimore Cooper in all documents.

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n. The parallel thus appears perfect, in every particular, so far as belligerent rights are concerned, and, of course, it is only of these rights that we are now speaking. With this introduction I proceed to produce the precedents. Mr. James Fenimore Cooper, the Naval Historian of the United States, is the author whom I shall quote, and his authority will certainly not be disputed north of the Potomac. One of the earliest cruises of the war of 1776, was made by Captain, afterward Commodorlts. It took a little time to warm the Congress and the people up to their work, but when they were once fairly warmed, they took their jackets off and went at it with a will, as is the wont of us Americans. Let us dip a little further into Mr. Cooper, and see what more, these staid New Englanders, who now have such a horror of piracy, did. The proceedings in Congress, he continues, in reference to assailing British commerce, as has been seen, were reserved and cautious. War not being