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e subsequently by Gens. Casey and Naglee, I am induced to believe that portions of the division behaved well, and made a most gallant stand against superior numbers; but at present the accounts are too conflicting to enable me to discriminate with certainty. When the facts are clearly ascertained, the exceptional good conduct will be properly acknowledged. G. B. Mcclellan, Major-General Commanding. Rebel reports and narratives. Gen. Johnston S report. Richmond, June 24, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: sir: Before the thirtieth of May I had ascertained from trusty scouts that Keyes's corps was encamped on this side of the Chickahominy, near the Williamsburgh road. On that day Major-Gen. D. H. Hill reported a strong body immediately in his front. On receiving this report, I determined to attack them next morning, hoping to be able to defeat Keyes's corps completely in its more advanced position before it could be reenforced. Written orders were des
nt out to reconnoitre, and were fired upon by the enemy's infantry and artillery. Our pickets being driven in, our forces were again formed in order of battle, Gen. Cooper's brigade on Bolivar Heights to the right, and Gen. Slough's brigade to the left of the road leading to Charlestown. After two or three hours, the enemy not ap and turn our batteries against us. The movement having been decided upon, orders were immediately given for its prompt execution. This was about midnight. Gen. Cooper's brigade was at once set in motion, and by daylight had succeeded in crossing the river and occupying the heights on the Maryland side. Gen. Slough's brigade arize individual instances of good conduct. As a general thing, the troops bore their fatigue and hardships with cheerfulness. Great credit is due to Brigadier-Generals Cooper and Slough, commanding the First and Second brigades respectively, for their untiring exertions during the five days and nights' siege. Also, to Col. D.
Rivers's house on their retreat. Enemy's loss probably eight hundred men; ours under one hundred. The brave Capts. Reid, of Colonel Lamar's regiment of artillery, and King, of Sumter Guard, Charleston battalion, Lieut. Edwards, and many other gallant men of ours, killed. Colonel Hagood, while leading his horse by the reins, had them severed by a piece of shell. Several of the enemy bravely mounted our ramparts. Several got to the rear of it by flanking it on the left. June 17.--General S. Cooper, Senior General C. S.A., visited the Island to-day. June 18.--Flag of truce from the enemy, to inquire after wounded and prisoners, and asking leave to send comforts to them, and offering similar privilege to us as to our men. June 20.--A few shells thrown by a gunboat to-day at men at work on our west line. July 1.--Total inactivity of the enemy, offensively, since repulse of sixteenth ult., except the firing of the few shells on twentieth. Grand salute to-day, at sunrise, a
h article of war. By command of the Secretary of War, S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General. Doc. 95.-occupatiarters army of Kentucky, Richmond, Ky., Aug. 30, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General C. S. Army, Richmond, he rear of the Pennsylvania reserve corps was stationed Capt. Cooper's First Pennsylvania battery of four pieces; Captain Raed to by one of Simmons's twenty-pounders on our left, and Cooper's battery on our right. The enemy continued the firing foreen River. Major-General Jones's report. To General S. Cooper, Adjutant-General C. S.: A courier from General Brs, Major-General. General Bragg's report. To General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: The garrison at t been brought forward to meet us. At this time the gallant Cooper fell. A shell fell in my lines, killing eight men at one ssissippian account. Baldwin, Sept. 24, 1862. dear Cooper: I wrote you a short communication from IuKa, announcing i
faith whereof I have hereunto signed my name and set my seal, this the third day of May, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two. Jefferson Davis. 2. Brig.-Gen. Humphrey Marshall is charged with the due execution of the foregoing proclamation. He will forthwith establish an efficient military police, and will enforce the following orders: All distillation of spirituous liquors is positively prohibited, and the distilleries will forthwith be closed. The sale of spirituous liquors of any kind is also prohibited, and establishments for the sale thereof will be closed. 3. All persons infringing the above prohibitions, will suffer such punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a court-martial; provided that no sentence to hard labor for more than one month shall be inflicted by the sentence of a regimental court-martial, as directed by the sixty-seventh article of war. By command of the Secretary of War, S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General.
Rebel reports and narratives. Official report of Kirby Smith. headquarters army of Kentucky, Richmond, Ky., Aug. 30, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.: sir: It is my great pleasure to announce to you that God has thrice blessed our arms to-day. After a forced march, almost day and night, for three days, over a mountain wilderness, destitute alike of food and water, I found the enemy drawn up in force to oppose us, at a point eight miles from this place. With less than half my force I attacked and carried a very strong position at Mount Zion Church, after a very hard fight of two hours; again, a still better position at White's Farm, in half an hour; and, finally, in this town, just before sunset, our indomitable troops deliberately walked (they were too tired to run) up to a magnificent position manned by ten thousand of the enemy, many of them perfectly fresh, and carried it in fifteen minutes. It is impossible for me now to
time all our batteries had been stationed to the left of the turnpike, as the positions secured there enabled the gunners to work their pieces to advantage. About one hundred yards in the rear of the Pennsylvania reserve corps was stationed Capt. Cooper's First Pennsylvania battery of four pieces; Captain Ransom's, company C, Fifth United States battery, of four pieces, took a position at the extreme right, in the rear of the first brigade of Ricketts's division. Immediately after the line the slope of the mountains. The rebels opened on the column with two pieces, of cannon, directing the fire of one to the right, and of the other to the left of the line. They were replied to by one of Simmons's twenty-pounders on our left, and Cooper's battery on our right. The enemy continued the firing for upward of an hour, when, on account of the severe punishment he was receiving from our guns, and the near approach of our infantry to his pieces, he disappeared on the other side of the
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
but restoring me to the command, but telegraphic communication being in the mean time cut off, it did not reach me. Respectfully, C. L. D., Colonel Commanding United States Forces at Green River. Major-General Jones's report. To General S. Cooper, Adjutant-General C. S.: A courier from General Bragg's headquarters, eight miles west of Munfordville, on the night of the eighteenth instant, confirms the report that Bragg captured about five thousand men at Munfordville on the seven about twenty-three thousand Kentuckians had joined Gen. Smith, and they were still coming. The home guard was delivering up their guns as rapidly as they could be received. Samuel Jones, Major-General. General Bragg's report. To General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: The garrison at this place surrendered last night without our firing a gun. We got four thousand (4000) prisoners, four thousand (4000) small arms, pieces of artillery and munitions in large quantities. B
erent battalions moving in line of battle, and dressing on their colors, with as much coolness and accuracy as though upon the drill-ground instead of the battle-field. After proceeding about two hundred yards, you ordered the charge to be made, when we rushed forward with a wild huzzah, peculiar to the Zouaves, and immediately received the fire of thousands of the enemy's fresh troops, consisting of artillery and infantry, which had been brought forward to meet us. At this time the gallant Cooper fell. A shell fell in my lines, killing eight men at one explosion — a round shot took off private Conway's head. While the infantry-fire was like hail around and among us, producing the most dreadful carnage, not a man who was not wounded, wavered or faltered, but all pressed on with charged bayonets to the top of the hill, and drove the enemy from his position. At this time our color-bearers and guard had all been shot down, when Capt. Lebair, of company F, seized one, and Capt. Leahy
feat, they are, however, likely to skedaddle in the wake of their disappointed and defeated superior, who, at the latest accounts, had started back to Tupelo, to gloat over another confederate victory (?). So, for the present, Northern Mississippi is safe from its liberators, and Buell has an opportunity of operating at his will against Bragg, from whose vicinity we are anxiously awaiting some stirring news. J. C. C. Jackson Mississippian account. Baldwin, Sept. 24, 1862. dear Cooper: I wrote you a short communication from IuKa, announcing its peaceable capture on the fourth, by the army under General Price. I believe I was a little congratulatory in my remarks, and spread out on the rich fruits of the bloodless capture. Indeed it was a sight to gladden the heart of a poor soldier, whose only diet for some time had been unsalted beef and whit leather hoecake, the stacks of cheese, crackers, preserves, mackerel, coffee, and other good things that lined the shelves of th
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