Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Samuel Cooper or search for Samuel Cooper in all documents.

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t, March 1, 1861. By the direction of the President of the United States, it is ordered that Brigadier-General David E. Twiggs be and is hereby dismissed from the army of the United States for his treachery to the flag of his country, in having surrendered on the 18th of February, 1861, on the demand of the authorities of Texas, the military posts and other property of the United States in his department and under his charge. J. Holt, Secretary of War. By order of the Secretary of War. S. Cooper, Adjutant-General. --Evening Post, March 4. The Secretary of War at Washington received a despatch from Major Anderson, in which he contradicts the statement that President Davis had been to Charleston. He says that the report that he had been sick is without a particle of foundation. He is in good health, as is also his little band of soldiers. Affairs in Charleston harbor are arriving at a point when further delay on their part will be impossible. Their extensive works of de
The New Orleans Delta in noting the fact says: We have been furnished with a copy of the letter of President Davis, written on the field of battle after the glorious victory at Manassas, acquainting Brig.-Gen. Beauregard of his promotion to the rank of General, the highest grade in the army of the Confederate States. This most richly deserved promotion and honor could not be conveyed in more just, tasteful, and appropriate terms.--The Generals of the Army of the Confederate States are Samuel Cooper, Robert E. Lee, Joseph E. Johnston, and P. G. T. Beauregard. Letter of President Davis. Manassas, Va., July 21, 1861. Sir: Appreciating your services in the battle of Manassas, and on several other occasions during the existing war, as affording the highest evidence of your skill as a commander, your gallantry as a soldier, and your zeal as a patriot, you are promoted to be General in the Army of the Confederate States of America, and with the consent of the Congress will be duly c
ne hundred and eighty miles from Fort Smith, Arkansas, between the forces of Col. Cooper and the Yankees, under Opothleyholo, estimated at four thousand or five thousand: Colonel Cooper had only about one thousand three hundred men. The Yankees attacked Col. Cooper about eleven o'clock, and the fight continued all day until suCol. Cooper about eleven o'clock, and the fight continued all day until sundown. Col. Simms' Texas regiment fought with great bravery, and the Choctaws, Chickasaws, and Creeks fought like tigers. The Yankees followed Col. Cooper severaCol. Cooper several miles, and attacked him with great fury. Col. Cooper drove them back to the woods, a distance of two miles. A large number of Cherokees were with Opothleyholo; liCol. Cooper drove them back to the woods, a distance of two miles. A large number of Cherokees were with Opothleyholo; likewise about one hundred and fifty Seminoles. Col. Drew, with his men, who remained with him, fought well and did good service. The Choctaws took about one hundreds regiment. Other deserters were taken and dealt with in tire same manner. Col. Cooper behaved with the greatest coolness and bravery.--Fort Smith (Ark.) Times, De
it is learned that a large number of Creeks, Cherokees, and Seminoles have joined Opothleyholo. The Cherokee regiment, under Colonel Drew, has disbanded, a part have joined the Nationals, a portion have returned home, and a part remain with Colonel Cooper. Opothleyholo is encamped about the Big Bend of Arkansas, with a force variously estimated at from two to four thousand men, well armed, and all naked to the waist, and painted. Colonel Cooper is encamped within five miles of the NationalColonel Cooper is encamped within five miles of the Nationals, with a small force, consisting of Colonel Simms' Texas regiment, Colonel McIntosh's Creek regiment, and the Chocktaw and Chickasaw regiment.--Fort Smith (Ark.) News, Dec. 12. Five vessels of the stone fleet, and the ships George Green and Bullion, of Gen. Butler's expedition, sailed to-day from Boston, Mass. An expedition, under Commander Rodgers, U. S. N., left Port Royal harbor, S. C., and explored Ossabaw Sound, Ga. It passed up the Vernon River, Ga., and was fired on by a fort o
o's farm. At Cleveland, Ohio, the City Council appropriated thirty-five thousand dollars to aid in recruiting for the new regiments.--At Detroit, Michigan, a meeting was held to facilitate the raising of new regiments. Patriotic resolutions were passed. A very large gathering of citizens was held in the Capitol Park, at Albany, N. Y. Great enthusiasm was manifested. Governor Morgan presided, and among the Vice-Presidents were Mayor Perry, Senator John V. L. Pruyn, John Tracy, General Cooper, and other prominent citizens. Strong resolutions in favor of the new levy, and recommending an extra session of the Legislature, to authorize the giving of a State bounty to volunteers, were introduced by George Dawson, chairman of the committee, and unanimously adopted. Speeches were made by Lyman Tremain and others. The Ninth regiment of Vermont volunteers, under the command of Col. George I. Stannard, left Brattleboro this morning at nine o'clock, en route for the seat of war.
September 30. A fight took place at Newtonia, Mo., between a force of Union troops under the command of Gen. Salomon, and a body of rebels under Col. Cooper, resulting in the retreat of the Nationals.--(Doc. 213.) Commodore Harwood, commanding Potomac flotilla, reported to the Navy Department that the rebel bomb-proof magazines at Lower Shipping Point, Va., had been destroyed, under the super-intendence of Lieut. Commander Magaw. They were seven in number, and the work was found heavier than was anticipated. A small body of rebel cavalry made its appearance, but dispersed upon the discharge of a volley of musketry from the Nationals. A fight took place at Russellville, Ky., between a force of Union troops under the command of Colonel Harrison, Seventeenth Kentucky, and a body of about three hundred and fifty rebels, resulting in a rout of the latter with a loss of thirty-five of their number killed and ten taken prisoners.--Grayson, Ky., was this day entered and occ
gons. Three or four hours thereafter, the rebels were overtaken by detachments of the Fifth and Sixth regiments, Missouri cavalry, under the command of Colonel Catherwood, and utterly routed. They were pursued for twenty-five or thirty miles with great loss. The Unionists did not lose a man.--Missouri Democrat. The steamer Darlington, with a company of colored troops on board, under the command of Colonel O. T. Beard, proceeded up Bell River, Florida, drove in the rebel pickets below Cooper's, destroyed their place of rendezvous, then destroyed the salt-works, and all the salt, corn, wagons, and horses which could not be taken away. Thence proceeded to Jolly River and destroyed two salt-works, with a large amount of salt and corn. Thence went to Saint Mary's, and brought off two families of contrabands, after driving in the rebel pickets. Captain Flint, of the First Vermont cavalry, with eighty men of his company, doing picket-duty in the vicinity of New Baltimore, Va.,
as continued.--at New York the riot was suppressed, quiet was restored and business resumed.--Provost-Marshal General J. B. Fry ordered the enforcement of the draft in New England and the Middle States, by the aid of the military.--Edwin Hides and Henry Light, at York, England, were sentenced to imprisonment for counterfeiting the circulating notes of the United States.--the battle of Elk Creek, Kansas, was fought this day, by the National forces under General Blunt, and the rebels under General Cooper.--(Docs. 100 and 109.) The cavalry battle near Shepherdstown, Va., was fought this day. (Doc. 145 1/2.)--Major-General Stanley, in command of the National forces, entered Huntsville, Alabama, without opposition, capturing six hundred horses, two hundred of them having contraband riders.--many of the most prominent and influential lawyers of the cities of Brooklyn and New York, sensible of the wrongs inflicted during the late riots upon the colored inhabitants of these cities and vic
alry, who charged upon him and were repulsed. They purposely retreated, Captain Somers and his company pursuing until they entered the fatal ambuscade. At the first fire Captain Somers and ten men were killed, as many more wounded, and nearly all the others captured. The few who escaped carried the information into camp, and the rest of the cavalry started Zzz in pursuit, but were unable to come up with the rebels.--the following order was issued at Richmond, Va., by the rebel Adjutant-General Cooper: The Chief of the Nitre and Mining Bureau is directed, through the officers of his bureau, to impress copper, coal, and such other minerals as may be needed for the use of the government. --A fight occurred near Salem, Miss., between four thousand rebels, under General S. D. Lee, and five thousand Nationals, under McCullis and Phillips, resulting in the defeat of the rebels with a loss of fifteen killed and wounded.--A mob at Jackson, N. H., burned the hotel where the Deputy Provost
November 3. Colonel Fitzgibbon, of the Thirteenth Michigan infantry, overtook the combined forces of Cooper, Kirk, Williams, and Scott, numbering four hundred men, this morning, at Lawrenceburgh, thirty-five miles south of Columbia, Tenn. After a severe hand-to-hand fight, he defeated them with a loss on his part of three men wounded, and eight horses killed. The rebel loss was eight killed, seven wounded, and twenty-four prisoners, among them one captain and two lieutenants. General Bragg's forage-train, sent up Lookout Valley, in front of his position, was captured. The train was sent to camp. The train-guard was also captured.--Official Report. General Saxton issued a circular to the freedmen of South-Carolina, authorizing them to locate in the lands in that department which were about to be sold by the Tax Commissioners, not exceeding twenty acres for each head of a family. The description of the land, when located, to be accompanied by the deposit of the Governme
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