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John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XI (search)
ent an infantry reconnoissance to learn the facts. If it proves true, I will act according to your instructions received this morning. Please send orders to General Cooper, 1 Cooper commanded the brigade guarding the river below Columbia. via Johnsonville. It may be doubtful whether my messenger from here will reach him. Cooper commanded the brigade guarding the river below Columbia. via Johnsonville. It may be doubtful whether my messenger from here will reach him. The appendix to General Thomas's report says that I sent this despatch at 8:30 A. M. The appendix to my report says 8:20 A. M. This despatch was evidently in answer to those from General Thomas of 8 P. M. and 10:30 P. M., November 28, as indicated by my orders to Stanley and Ruger, and my despatch of 8:15 A. M. to Wilson. Sooglorious news, and I congratulate you and the brave men of your command; but you must look out that the enemy does not still persist. The courier you sent to General Cooper, at Widow Dean's, could not reach there, and reports that he was chased by rebel cavalry on the whole route, and finally came into this place. Major-General
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XIV (search)
ly in placing Hood's infantry force at about 30,000 men when he crossed the Tennessee and began his advance toward Nashville. He lost a considerable number at Spring Hill on November 29, and over 6000, besides thirteen general officers, at Franklin on November 30. Therefore 24,000 must be a liberal estimate of his infantry strength after the battle of Franklin. The infantry strength of the Fourth and Twenty-third corps did not exceed 22,000 present for duty equipped, of which one brigade (Cooper's) of the Twenty-third was sent by General Thomas to guard the fords of Duck River below Columbia, and did not rejoin the corps until after the battle of Franklin. Hence Hood's infantry force at Columbia and Franklin was nearly one half greater than mine. The disparity in cavalry was still greater at first, but was reduced very considerably by the arrival of cavalry sent from Nashville by General Thomas, especially Hammond's brigade, which arrived in the field on the 29th, too late to assi
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Index (search)
ir cause, 261; overawing the, 311 et seq.; final surrenders, 344; strong policy at outbreak of the war, 513, 516 Confidential communications, 238 Confiscation, question of, in Missouri, 56;-58, 73, 92; authorized by Congress, July 17, 1862, 57; instructions to S. concerning, 92 Connasauga River, military operations on the, 126, 129 Conservatives, in Missouri, 57 Constitution of the United States. See U. S. Constitution. Contemporaneous military history, the logic of, 198 Cooper, Maj.-Gen. Joseph A., guarding Duck River, 213, 258; battle of Franklin, 225 Coosa River, military movements on, 315, 316, 318 Copperheads, in Missouri, 57, 107 Corinth, Miss., possible movement of Beauregard against Nashville from, 321 Cotton, encouraging the marketing of, 372, 373; restrictions on the trade in, 373 Couch, Maj.-Gen. Darius N., battle of Nashville, 245, 246, 269, 270, 291 Courage, in the American soldier, 183; proper restraint of, 362-364 ; its value in def