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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John A. Cooper or search for John A. Cooper in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Last letters and telegrams of the Confederacy—Correspondence of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
Charlotte, April 27th, 1865. General John C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War: Dear Sir,—I send copy of telegram received at 11 O'clock to-day: Greensboro, 27th April. Brigadier-General Echols,—A military convention has been made by General Sherman and myself terminating hostilities between our commands. Send intelligence to Secretary of War, if you can, and give information to Major-General Stoneman. (Signed) J. E. Johnston. I have sent a flag of truce, with a letter of General Cooper, to General Stoneman. Yours, respectfully, William J. Hoke, Colonel Com. Post. Catawba Bridge, 28th April, 1865. Hon. Jno. C. Breckinridge, Sec'y of War: My Dear Sir,— I send you a dispatch just received with instructions to deliver it without delay. I have heard nothing from General Wade Hampton except what is mentioned in the enclosed dispatch. I have answered him at every point along the line, informing that the ferry at this point was in good order and that you had ord<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
ecial hostility is Mr. Davis, but the Confederate Secretaries of War, the chiefs of the war bureaus in Richmond, and Generals Cooper, Lee, A. S. Johnston, J. E. Johnston, besides many of lower rank, come in for their share of criticism — a criticismes in succession. This proposal Beauregard submitted through one of his staff to Mr. Davis on the night of July 14. Generals Cooper and Lee were called in conference by Mr. Davis. The plan required that General Johnston, who was seventy-five miles then describes the proposal of July 14 as a stroke of genius, and says: A high tribunal, composed of the President, Generals Cooper and Lee, took upon itself to check and render barren the strategic powers so greatly developed in General Beauregarde immortal Jackson alone is acknowledged to have been his peer. Over and over again, with tiresome iteration, are Davis, Cooper and Lee denounced for not committing themselves without hesitation to a scheme utterly impracticable as Beauregard put it
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations around Petersburg-General Hagood's report of 16th, 17th and 18th of June, 1864. (search)
Operations around Petersburg-General Hagood's report of 16th, 17th and 18th of June, 1864. headquarters Hagood's brigade, Hoke's division, 15th July, 1864. Capt. John A. Cooper, A. A. G.: Captain,—I am instructed to report the operations of my brigade on the 16th, 17th and 18th ulto. On the evening of the 15th, about dark, my brigade arrived at Petersburg, by the Petersburg & Richmond railroad, and I was at General Beauregard's headquarters, reporting for orders, when a courier announced that the enemy had carried the defences from No. 3 to No. 7, inclusive, and that our troops were retreating. I was ordered to move out immediately upon the City Point road and take a position to cover that approach to the city, and upon which a new defensive line could be taken. It was after dark, and being unacquainted with the country and unable to learn much from the confused and contradictory accounts of the volunteer guides who accompanied me, I halted my command at the junction
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters from General Lee to President Davis on the situation in September, 1863. (search)
ended that General Longstreet should be sent to oppose him, instead of to Atlanta. If General Bragg is unable to bring General Rosecrans to battle, I think it would be better to return General Longstreet to this army to enable me to oppose the advance of General Meade with a greater prospect of success. And it is a matter worthy of consideration whether General Longstreet's corps will reach General Bragg in time and condition to be of any advantage to him. If the report sent to me by General Cooper since my return from Richmond is correct, General Bragg had, on the 20th August last, 51,101 effective men; General Buckner, 20th August last, 16, 118 effective men. He was to receive from General Johnston 9,000 effective men. His total force will, therefore, be 76,219, as large a number as I presume he can operate with. This is independent of the local troops which, you may recollect, he reported as exceeding his expectations. Should General Longstreet reach General Bragg in time to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
hington. I think this whole campaign could be completed brilliantly in from fifteen to twenty days. Holmes assented readily; Johnston stated objections. At Richmond, a sort of council of war, composed of the President and of Generals Lee and Cooper, examined the scheme with much consideration and earnestness, and rejected it, although it was pronounced to be brilliant and exhaustive. This was done on the ground of reasons which were thought sufficient at the time, and which are mentioned imediately and directly to Washington, on account of the want of means of transportation, rations, etc., and on account of other obstacles, could not a portion at least of the original plan, conceived by Beauregard, and rejected by Davis, Lee, and Cooper, have been executed? McDowell was crushed, not, it is true, according to that brilliant and exhaustive plan; but was he not sufficiently crushed to have permitted Johnston's troops, who had come in a few hours to Manassas, to return swiftly to t