Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for S. Cooper or search for S. Cooper in all documents.

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eorganized as four-gun batteries. In some cases there were regimental organizations comprising 12 batteries, but most of the troops in this arm of the service were independent commands; even where there was a regimental organization, each battery acted separately and independently of the others. In the volunteer service the leading batteries, in point of loss in battle, were as follows: Killed and died of wounds. Light Artillery. Synonym.     Battery. Corps. Officers. Men. Total. Cooper's - B 1st Penn. Artillery First 2 19 21 Sands' -   11th Ohio Battery Seventeenth -- 20 20 Phillips' -   5th Mass. Battery Fifth 1 18 19 Weeden's - C 1st R. I. Artillery Fifth -- 19 19 Cowan's -   1st N. Y. Battery Sixth 2 16 18 Stevens' -   5th Maine Battery First 2 16 18 Ricketts' - F 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 17 18 Easton's - A 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 16 17 Kern's - G 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 16 17 Randolph's - E 1st R. I. <
It remained there until October, at which time the Reserves marched into Virginia. The regiment was assigned to the Third Brigade, General E. O. Ord; this brigade fought the battle of Dranesville, December 20, 1861, one of the first of the Union victories. The division marched with McDowell in his advance on Manassas, in the spring of 1862, and then was transferred to the Army of the Potomac, where it was actively engaged in the Seven Days Battle. At Glendale it made a desperate fight over Cooper's Battery, in which affair it captured the colors of the Tenth Alabama. Rejoining McDowell's Corps it fought at Manassas, where it lost 12 killed, 52 wounded, and 35 missing. Closely following, came South Mountain and Antietam, the casualties in the latter amounting to 17 killed, and 66 wounded. General C. F. Jackson, the brigade commander and former Colonel of the Ninth, fell mortally wounded at Fredericksburg. In the spring of 1864, the regiment crossed the Rapidan with Grant, but on May
ysburg 1 24 -- 25 Turnbull's F & K, 3d United States Gettysburg 9 14 1 24 Bush's -- 4th Indiana Stone's River 5 19 -- 24 Edgerton's E, 1st Ohio Stone's River 3 20 25 48 Adams's G, 1st Rhode Island Fredericksburg 5 18 -- 23 Cooper's B, Appears twice in this list. 1st Pennsylvania Manassas 4 19 -- 23 Cowan's -- 1st New York Cedar Creek 6 17 -- 23 Bridges's -- -- Illinois Chickamauga 6 16 4 26 Cushing's (H. C.) H, 4th United States Chickamauga 5 17 -- 22 Creek 3 17 8 28 Watson's I, 5th United States Gettysburg 1 19 2 22 Nims's -- 2d Massachusetts Sabine X Roads 1 18 1 20 Tompkins's A, 1st Rhode Island Antietam 4 15 -- 19 Kern's G, 1st Pennsylvania Gaines's Mill 7 12 -- 19 Cooper's B, 1st Pennsylvania Seven Days 4 15 -- 19 McKnight's M, 5th United States Cedar Creek 2 17 4 23 Woodbury's M, 1st New York Chancellorsville 5 13 4 22 Harris's -- 19th Indiana Chickamauga 2 16 2 20 Standart's B, 1st Ohio Sto
visional Heavy Art'y) served in the Ninth Corps. ----, ‘62 3d Pennsylvania   19 19 1 214 215 234     Sept., ‘64 5th Pennsylvania Enlisted for one year.   3 3   46 46 49   Twenty-sec'd. Sept., ‘64 6th Pennsylvania Enlisted for one year.   2 2   44 44 46   Twenty-sec'd.   Light Artillery.                     1st Pennsylvania L. A.--       1   1 1     May, ‘61 A-- Served through the war. Easton's 1 16 17   21 21 38   First. June, ‘61 B-- Served through the war. Cooper's 2 19 21   17 17 38   First. June, ‘61 C--McCarthy's   2 2   12 12 14   Sixth. July, ‘61 D-- Served through the war. Munk's   11 11 1 18 19 30   Sixth. June, ‘61 E-- Served through the war. Miller's   2 2   21 21 23   Eighteenth. July, ‘61 F-- Served through the war. Ricketts's 1 17 18   13 13 31   First. July, ‘61 G-- Served through the war. Kern's 1 16 17   14 14 31   First. July, ‘61 H-- Serve
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
, according to their best authorities, numbered over 600,000 effective men; of whom not over 400,000 were enrolled at any time. Southern Historical Society Papers: Vol. VII, page 288; an estimate by Dr. Joseph Jones, and approved by Adjutant-General S. Cooper, in which the available force is put at 600,00. These eleven States furnished, also, 86,009 men to the Union Armies, receiving in return over 19,000 men from the Border. Many will hold, and with good reasons, that 600,000 is too low enemy's hands, they were not included in the hospital report. This loss occurred mostly in the first day's fight, where the regiment encountered the 151st Pennsylvania The 151st Penn. lost 335 at Gettysburg, killed, wounded, and missing. and Cooper's Battery, of Rowley's Brigade, Doubleday's Division. The Quartermaster of the 26th, who made the official report on July 4th, states that there were only 216 left for duty after the fight on the 1st inst. The regiment then participated in Picke