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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. W. Corcoran or search for W. W. Corcoran in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
manly Federal officer, he asked me if I would be introduced to Colonel Corcoran. Where is he? I asked. He pointed out a rough, coarse-lookinthat I had never preached in Libby prison on any subject while Colonel Corcoran was there; that I had never spoken to him nor he to me on any e spider-web stuff of a braggart's flimsy brain. The close of Colonel Corcoran's life, as I have learned, was characteristic. In December 18same manner as the crew of the Savannah should be. The name of Colonel Corcoran was the first drawn out of the urn, to be held as a hostage foson Davis, who had been condemned to be hung in Philadelphia. Colonel Corcoran was given to understand that he would be hung on the day after of connection that seriously interfered with our programme. W. W. Corcoran, Esq., Vice-President of our Society for the District of Columbrize it as a new evidence of the wise and liberal interest which Mr. Corcoran has always taken in our work, as he does, indeed, in every good
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
day, in company with a gentlemanly Federal officer, he asked me if I would be introduced to Colonel Corcoran. Where is he? I asked. He pointed out a rough, coarse-looking man in his shirt sleeves, s of Albany, by assuring them that I had never preached in Libby prison on any subject while Colonel Corcoran was there; that I had never spoken to him nor he to me on any subject, and that the whole sporing canard woven out of the spider-web stuff of a braggart's flimsy brain. The close of Colonel Corcoran's life, as I have learned, was characteristic. In December 1863, having meanwhile been exclls, to be dealt with in the same manner as the crew of the Savannah should be. The name of Colonel Corcoran was the first drawn out of the urn, to be held as a hostage for Captain Smith, of the privateer Jefferson Davis, who had been condemned to be hung in Philadelphia. Colonel Corcoran was given to understand that he would be hung on the day after authentic information was received that Captai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
d us to travel in comfort over these splendid lines, and we were favored in not encountering on this long journey a single a single accident, and in having no detention or failure of connection that seriously interfered with our programme. W. W. Corcoran, Esq., Vice-President of our Society for the District of Columbia, has recently done a very graceful and warmly appreciated act in purchasing from Dr. George W. Bagby, and presenting to the Society, a very valuable collection of war annals—emhopes soon to turn over to us his completed work. We need not say that this will be a very valuable addition to our material, and that far beyond its intrinsic value we shall prize it as a new evidence of the wise and liberal interest which Mr. Corcoran has always taken in our work, as he does, indeed, in every good word and work. A meeting of the Southern Historical Society in Nashville has been arranged for May 22nd, 23rd, and 24th, in response to a cordial invitation from the Tennessee
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
subscriptions due us make an amount which we need just now, and we beg our friends who are in arrears to remit at once. And you will make your own remittance all the more welcome if you will send another subscription along with your own. Mr. Corcoran's valuable and highly appreciated gift of the Ana, of the war, collected and arranged by Dr. Geo. W. Bagby, has been completed by the turning over to us of the last two volumes. We again express our warmest acknowledgements of this renewed expression of Mr. Corcoran's interest in our work—an interest to which he has again and again given practical expression. our endowment Fund project grows upon us, the more we think of it, both as to its necessity and the practicability of its accomplishment. An endowment fund of at least $100,000, and a fire proof building are both absolutely essential to our full success. And the conviction increases that we can and will (by God's blessing and the cooperation of our friends) accomplish both
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
hugh Lee, G. W. Custis Lee, W. H. F. Lee and F. H. Smith, of Virginia; Judge H. W. Bruce, of Kentucky; Hon. C. R. Breckinridge, of Arkansas; Mrs. Stonewall Jackson and her daughter, Miss Julia; Mrs. J. E. B. Stuart and her daughter, Miss Virginia; Mrs. General George E. Pickett; Mrs. J. M. Carlisle, widow of General Anderson of Kentucky; E. V. Valentine the sculptor, and his wife; Mrs. General E. G. Lee; Mrs. Margaret J. Preston; Mrs. W. H. F. Lee and her two boys; Captain Robert E. Lee; W. W. Corcoran Esq., of Washington; Father Ryan, Colonel T. M. R. Talcott and Colonel H. E. Peyton, former members of General Lee's staff; Colonel William Allan of Stonewall Jackson's old staff; Colonel William H. Palmer, of General A. P. Hill's staff; the Trustees and Faculty of Washington and Lee University, and the Virginia Military Institute; and a number of others too numerous to mention. The beautiful little daughter of Major Daniel who held his crutch, handed him water, and wiped his brow, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
less to add that a collection of letters and papers concerning events which transpired during the important and stirring period of colonial history from 1751 to 1755 cannot fail to be of deep interest and permanent historic value, and as these papers are published for the first time from the original Mss. they are only now brought within reach of the historian, and will prove a rich mine in which he can work. The Virginia Historical Society is indebted to the enlightened liberality of W. W. Corcoran, Esqr., for their possession of these papers and their ability to use them, and they have very properly accompanied the volume with a fine likeness of the great philanthropist, and his autograph letter making the valuable gift. The few extra copies for sale will, of course, be bought up at once, as no historic collection could be called complete without the Dinwiddie Papers. recollections of A naval officer. 1841-1865. By Captain William Hamar Parker. New York: Charles Scribner's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
money, but which is of priceless value, for the vindication of the name and fame of our Confederate people. Our collection is widely recognized as of great value, and writers are freely consulting it. But we are still anxious to collect everything which may be of any value, and we again appeal to our friends to help us by sending to our archives (as a loan, if they cannot give it) any material which they may have or can secure. We especially commend the example of our honored friend, W. W. Corcoran, Esq., (our Vice-President for the District of Columbia,) who has, during the year, added to his previous kindness by purchasing and presenting to the Society valuable material. If our work were to close now, we feel assured that we have already accomplished grand results, and that even if our collection were scattered, our publications would live on and testify for the truth. But we have an increasing conviction that we are but on the threshold of our usefulness, if we can enter t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Material on hand. (search)
money, but which is of priceless value, for the vindication of the name and fame of our Confederate people. Our collection is widely recognized as of great value, and writers are freely consulting it. But we are still anxious to collect everything which may be of any value, and we again appeal to our friends to help us by sending to our archives (as a loan, if they cannot give it) any material which they may have or can secure. We especially commend the example of our honored friend, W. W. Corcoran, Esq., (our Vice-President for the District of Columbia,) who has, during the year, added to his previous kindness by purchasing and presenting to the Society valuable material. If our work were to close now, we feel assured that we have already accomplished grand results, and that even if our collection were scattered, our publications would live on and testify for the truth. But we have an increasing conviction that we are but on the threshold of our usefulness, if we can enter t