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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 30, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for W. W. Corcoran or search for W. W. Corcoran in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: August 30, 1861., [Electronic resource], Mr. Russell's second letter on the Manassas rout — an editorial from the London Times. (search)
soldiers, and pages of incidents of the battle which may be consulted by the curious; but there is a concurrence of testimony to the good conduct of Blenker's Germans, the Sixty-Ninth, (Irish,) and the Seventy-Ninth, (Scotch) Capt. Meagher, indeed, I am told, yielded to the universal panic, and was seen on foot at Centreville making the best of his way towards Fort Corcoran, with exclamations which implied that for the moment he recognized the Southern Confederacy as highly belligerent. Col. Corcoran, conspicuous by his great stature, being a man of six feet and half in height, was an object of attraction to the enemy, and is lying dangerously, if not mortally, wounded. Value of the Union sentiment of the North. The great question to be decided just now is the value of the Union sentiment in the North. Will the men and the money be forthcoming, and that soon enough to continue the war of aggression or recuperation against the seceded States? The troops here complain of won
atisfactorily proved to the Government that the visit of these gentleman to the South was purely on private business, and that the funds found in their possession are the proceeds of collections of money due them. Rumored arrest of W. W. Corcoran, the Banker. It is currently reported that W. W. Corcoran has been arrested for treason by the Provost Marshal; he has been supposed to be a warm friend of the Confederate cause, and to have had caucuses at his house, where traitors wouldW. W. Corcoran has been arrested for treason by the Provost Marshal; he has been supposed to be a warm friend of the Confederate cause, and to have had caucuses at his house, where traitors would meet and compares notes and congratulate themselves upon the successes of their friends. He has now, it his arrest incorrect, been checked in his career. The Tortugas. The Tortugas is a bleak and barren sand key in the Gulf of Mexico, about one hundred miles Southwest from Cape Sable. It is cheerless and uncomfortable, decidedly one of the most uncomfortable points to which the Government is obliged to send its insubordinate. The Federal mutineers, banished to Tortugas, do not go as