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sed in the larger services were given to the parish by Mrs. Dudley Hall in 1868. The cruets and the smaller chalice were given by Miss Edna J. Manning, formerly a member of the Altar Guild. The pix was the gift of Miss Virginia Lee. The cruets are of cut glass, with silver trimmings. The other vessels are of silver. Suspended from the roof of the chancel is a corona chandelier, a Christmas gift from the Sunday-school in 1877. It is of polished brass, with twenty-four burners, made by Cornelius & Sons, Philadelphia, and exhibited by them at the Centennial Exposition. The hanging of the altar, the dorsal, and antepen-dium for pulpit consist of drapery, with emblems in raised needlework. There are four sets of these embroideries beautifully wrought in as many colors. White, used in Easter, Ascension and Epiphany seasons, symbolizes the sun-bright light of truth, innocence, joy, etc. Red, used at Whitsunday and Saints' days, stands for ardent love and for fire. Green, used at Tr
By W. T. D. Clemm — Is the new chapter to be regarded as containing the doctrine and belief of the Church on slavery? Answer.--The new chapter contains admo and advice, and from its position in the church claims to be the doctrine of the on slavery. By B. F. Brooke.--Is not every man a sinner against God and nature who holds a slave, by the sense of the new chapter on slavery in the Discipline? Answer.--He is, in the sense of the Discipline whatever that sense is. Cornelius.--Is not, under the Discipline the duty of each minister to engage in ..efforts for the abolition of slavery? Answer.--Not more so under the present and under the former Discipline. A Griffith said that the New Chapter was pronouns. It was passed to give offence to the South. The old Methodist preachers, their God chosen, but despised of men, built to the Church. Guided by the Methodist preacher's mark — a sapling at each bend in the road pulled down, and half the top broken
A Juvenile common drunkard. --This forenoon the Clerk of the Police Court called for Cornelius Holland, and informed that person that he was charged with being a common drunkard. The spectators looked for Holland, but saw him not. He was too small to be visible above the bar at which he was arraigned. Our reporter peered over the railing and saw a stunted child, eight years old, with a round, red face, and black eyes and hair. Cornelius plead not guilty, and when the evidence of the officer was given in he cross-questioned the officer sharply. "When you saw me drunk, why didn't you arrest me at the time?" The officer said he had carried him into the house repeatedly when he was too drunk to walk. It appears that his boy was one of the crew of young tipplers who collect old junk for the means of gratifying their precociously formed appetite for r. g. rum. The boy in this case was arrested in order that his life might be saved. What kind of liquor sellers have they in South B
Cutting. --Cornelius, slave to William Tally, of New Kent, was arraigned before the Mayor last Saturday morning, to answer the charge of feloniously cutting, stabbing and wounding Ephraim, slave of Nicholas Lipscomb, of Hanover. The two negroes are market men, and while in the wagon yard of Mr. Richards got into a dispute, when Cornelius drew a pocket-knife and plunged it into the right arm of Ephraim, inflicting an ugly, though not dangerous flesh wound. The Mayor, on hearing the factsMayor last Saturday morning, to answer the charge of feloniously cutting, stabbing and wounding Ephraim, slave of Nicholas Lipscomb, of Hanover. The two negroes are market men, and while in the wagon yard of Mr. Richards got into a dispute, when Cornelius drew a pocket-knife and plunged it into the right arm of Ephraim, inflicting an ugly, though not dangerous flesh wound. The Mayor, on hearing the facts, remanded the accused to be tried for felony at the December term of the Husting Court.
Mary Shay, charged with feloniously stealing $30 from Patrick Reynolds, on the 14th November, was examined and remanded for final trial before Judge Lyons. Peter Scott, a free negro, charged with stealing a gold watch from Dr. John R. Brooks, on the 18th of October, was tried and acquitted. Samuel H. Jefford, charged with feloniously stealing $30 from Martin L. Covington, on the 15th of May, having waived an examination, is to be tried before Judge Lyons on Monday next. Cornelius, slave to Wm. Tally, charged with feloniously cutting and stabbing Ephraim, slave to Nicholas Lipscomb, on the 29th of November, was found guilty and ordered thirty-nine stripes. P. J. Wright, for permitting his slave, Edward, to go at large, was fined $10 and cost. Charles Reininger, charged with stealing $166 from Frederick Hauster and Max Stadelhofer, on the 5th of December, was examined and remanded for final trial before Judge Lyons. Griffin, the property of Jno. L. Cox
Mayor's Court. --James, slave to J. M. Conway, was punished for fast driving — John, slave to J. M. Woodfin, flogged for stealing a hand-cart.--Edward Gilman, sent to jail for being drunk in the street.--Peter Crow, committed for vagrancy.--William Gilroy, held to security for being drunk.--Cornelius, a slave, flogged for carrying a loaded cane. --Warner Babler, committed in default of security for being disorderly.
Cage Items. --John Brady and David Beattie, charged with fighting in the street, were examined at the lower watch-house yesterday morning, and acquitted. James A. Thompson, arrested for taking a glass too much — that is, he broke the glass in one of Dr. Garlick's windows — was discharged from custody, after an investigation. Polly Johnson, who escaped from the poor-house and was found trespassing on Louis Botto's premises, was detained, and will probably be sent back to her place of residence. Cornelius, a slave was sentenced to receive 20 lashes for stealing a turke
Elected. --Cornelius B Riddick, of Suffolk, has been elected and will accept the Presidency of Wesleyan Female College, at Murfreesboro', N. C.
Saturday night. The evidence was to the effect that McDonald (acting as a conservator of the peace) had taken the pistol from Sharp, who, being slightly under the influence of liqueur, had drawn it on several people. The Mayor said no larceny had been committed by the defendant, by the complainant's own testimony. The case was dismissed. Charles J. Clements, of Colonel Rosser's cavalry company, then testified that while stopping at Bradford's restaurant, some short time since, he had been robbed of a Navy revolver, and that he had seen it at the gunsmithing establishment of Mr. James Walsh. The latter being introduced as a witness, testified that he had purchased the pistol of McDonald for $40; that he had offered to sell another one to him, which he declined to buy. Clements identified the pistol. Prisoner said it belonged to Cornelius. McCoy; and the Mayor, in order to afford him a chance of producing McCoy, continued the case until this morning. McDonald was sent to jail.
Absconded Slave--$25 reward. --Left my place on James river, upper end of Henrico county, on Sunday last, June 29, 1862 without any cause, my Servant Man, Cornelius, commonly called Buck. He is about 25 years of age, rather small, well made, black, good, teeth, likely, and no marks; about 5 feet 7 inches high. He is no doubt lurking about Richmond or endeavoring to get employment as servant in some of the camps, having many acquaintances among the servants in Richmond, but in no other place. For his safe delivery to Blair & Chamberlayne, or placed in jail so they get him, they will pay the above reward. jy 4--6t John Wickham.
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