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of the 71st N. Y., as he may have mistaken the rear guard, organized under my direction by your order, for the evening. Capt. Arnold's battery and the cavalry were directed, and placed in their positions by my senior staff officer, up to the time when Col. Heintzelman ordered the cavalry to the front of the column. Through inadvertence in copying Colonel Porter's Report, the names of the following officers were omitted, of whom honorable mention was then made: Major Wentworth and Quartermaster Cornell, both of the New York 8th, also Lieutenant Averill's name was mutilated. N. Y. Tribune, Aug. 16. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. Porter, Col. 16th Regt., U. S. A., Commanding. Capt. Griffin's report. camp near Arlington, Va., July 25, 1861. Col. A. Porter, Commanding Second Brigade: Colonel: In compliance with your instructions, I have the honor to report that Battery D, Fifth regiment of Artillery, arrived on the battlefield near Manassas at about 11 1
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, chapter 56 (search)
useum of American Archaeology, at Cambridge, Massachusetts, an important place is always assigned to the researches of Miss Alice C. Fletcher and Miss Cornelia Studley. At the late triennial meeting of the intercollegiate society of Phi Beta Kappa — the only such society based on scholarship in America, all others existing merely for social purposes --it came out incidentally that at least three out of the twenty chapters now composing the fraternity had already admitted women as members, Cornell having a dozen. All these signs indicate a steady progress in the admission of women to the ranks, not of thought and action alone, but of study and scholarship. When we turn from science to literature, the advance is not quite so marked. It is considerable and substantial; yet in view of the completeness with which literary work is now thrown open to women, and their equality as to pay, there is room for some surprise that it is not greater. Women have engaged largely in journalism,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
iterature of the reform movement; Carl Schurz, Curtis's successor as head of the Civil Service Reform League and champion of the movement in the President's cabinet; Andrew D. White See Book III, Chap. XV. and Charles W. Eliot, presidents of Cornell and Harvard; and a group of young politicians, among whom were Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge. Soon the attitude toward civil service reform became the test of executive independence. Hayes was notable for the aid he rendered it, w. At Amherst it was taught as early as 1841, if not before, by William Chauncey Fowler, Noah Webster's son-in-law. In 1851 Child introduced it at Harvard. In 1856 it reached Lafayette; in 1867, Haverford; in 1868, St. John's College; in 1871, Cornell; and by 1875 it was read at Columbia and the University of Wisconsin, and at Yale in the Sheffield Scientific School and the Post-Graduate Department. Fowler by his teaching and Webster through his writings are said to have exercised a domina
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
l of Trusts, the, 442 Convict 999, 287 Convito, 488 Conway, Moncure D., 120 Cook, Joseph, 210 Cooke, John Esten, 67-68, 69 Cooke, P. St. George, 143 Cooke, Rose Terry, 86 Coolen Bawn, the, 511 Coomassie and Magdala, 163 Cooper, James Fenimore, 6, 66, 67. 68, 85, 89, 190, 227, 520, 549, 550 551, 563, 579 Cooper, Peter, 348 Cooper, Thomas, 433 Copernicus, 524 Copley, John, 498 Corea, The Hermit Nation, 155 Corleone, 88 Cormon, 271 Corneille, 591 Cornell, 41, 177, 354, 479 Corplanter, 154 Coronado, 621 Corruptions of Christianity, 521 Cosi Fan Tutte, 449 Cosmopolitan, 316 Cost of a national crime, the, 363 Cost the limit of price, 437 Cotton is King, 341 Cotton Kingdom, the, 162 Cotton States in 1875, 352 Cottrelly, Mathilde, 587 Count Frontenac and New France under Louis XIV, 190 Country Cousin, the, 288 Country of the Dwarfs, the, 163 County chairman, the, 289 Courmont, Felix de, 596 Courrier, 591
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
31, ‘63, to rank June 11, ‘63. Jan. 31, ‘63, Hospital, Tuscumbia, June 11, ‘63, ordered to report to Col. Roddy. Aug. 31, ‘63, to Feb. 29, ‘64, 4th Alabama Cavalry. Jackson, Bolling Hall, Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War July 13, ‘63, to rank April 22, 63, to report to Medical-Director. Passed Board A. B. M. E., at Chattanooga April 22, ‘63, ordered to report to Flewellen, May 8, ‘63, ordered to report to Gen. Wheeler's Elite Corps, Feb. 27, ‘64, ordered to report to Surgeon Cornell, Medical-Director Hospital, Charleston, S. C. James, J. A., Surgeon. Sept. 30, 1863, 15th S. C. Regiment. Jackson, John F., Surgeon. Oct. 31, 1863, 8th Georgia Regiment. Jackson, James Monroe, Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War to rank Jan. 3, ‘63, to report to Col. Quarles. Passed Board at Clinton, La., Dec. ‘62. Nov. 30, ‘63, 49th Tennessee Regiment. Transferred. Jones, Hilton S., Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War July 15, ‘62, report to G
rk — speech of welcome by the Mayor--Mr. Lincoln's reply — Incidents, &c. A large crowd gathered in the Park, at New York, on Wednesday morning, to witness the official reception of the President elect. Mr. Lincoln arrived at a few minutes before eleven o'clock, in charge of the Committee of the Common Council, and was immediately escorted to the Governor's Rooms, where the Mayor and a few friends, with the members of the press, awaited his coming. He was introduced to the Mayor by Mr. Cornell, of the Board of Aldermen. The Mayor spoke as follows: The Mayor's speech. Mr. Lincoln: As Mayor of New York, it becomes my duty to extend to you an official welcome in behalf of the corporation. In doing so, permit me to say that this city has never offered hospitality to a man clothed with more exalted powers, or resting under graver responsibilities, than those which circumstances have devolved upon you. Coming into office with a dismembered Government to reconstruct, and a
ving the consoling privilege of returning it. For reasons which will readily appear to the intelligent reader, I shall say nothing of the disposition, number, movements, or plans of our force — a feature in letter-writing that should be more generally adopted in Virginia. Thus much I will say, on behalf of the companies at present under command of Lieut. Col. Stewart: they are all well, in fine spirits, and "eager for the fray." It may not be out of place to mention here that Private Cornell, of the Young Guard, served as one of the aids to Col. Magruder during the hottest of the fight, riding from one end of our line to the other continually, with the coolness of a veteran. Honor to whom honor is due. The "craft" is very well represented in the Young Guard, there being eight printers among them, who will handle the shooting-stick with destructive effect upon the solid columns of the Northern leaders, and will possibly double-lead all the minions the old Ape of the No
The Daily Dispatch: July 9, 1861., [Electronic resource], A young man Kills his betrothed and then drowned himself. (search)
A young man Kills his betrothed and then drowned himself. --A terrible tragedy occurred at Ithaca, N. Y., a few days age. It appears that a young man named Cornell, nineteen years old, was engaged to a girl of seventeen. The friends of the parties objected to the marriage. Cornell invited his betrothed to ride, and on reaching a point beyond the city, he drew from his pocket a pistol and shot her, killing her instantly. Placing her body in the bottom of the carriage, he returned to the that a young man named Cornell, nineteen years old, was engaged to a girl of seventeen. The friends of the parties objected to the marriage. Cornell invited his betrothed to ride, and on reaching a point beyond the city, he drew from his pocket a pistol and shot her, killing her instantly. Placing her body in the bottom of the carriage, he returned to the village, fastened the horge to the door of his house, proceeded to the insist and threw himself in. He was subsequently taken out dead.
Examinations. --Messrs. Bingham, Wood worth, Hurst, Lydicker, and Cornell, arrested at Fairfax Court-House, and Mr. Partello, or Bartholow, arrested at Manassa, where he was, or claimed to be, merely a vender of newspapers, were taken before Commissioner Lyons yesterday, and underwent examination on the charge of being disloyal to the Confederate Government. We learn that the Commissioner was satisfied as to the innocence of most, if not all of them, and that they will probably be released; but at six o'clock last evening no order to that effect had been issued by the officer whose business it is to sign such.
Jos James, an engineer on the Wilmington and Manchester Railroad, was stabbed and killed on the 27th ult., in Wilmington, N. C., by James Thompson. The Northern papers give the cold shoulder to the "man Forter," (Charles H.,) and say he will not be allowed a seat in the Federal Congress as a member from North Carolina. Cornell Conway Felton, President of Harvard College, Mass., died on the 2th ult., near Chester, Pa. He was an author of considerable reputation.
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