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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
de defiance to France and England, who, in consequence, let us alone to work out our own destiny. Among others who were in favor of building up an iron-clad navy were citizens whose names should ever be remembered. At the time when the greatest opposition was being manifested against Ericsson's invention, and the government would only authorize the construction of the first Monitor on a guarantee that she should prove a success in battle, John A. Griswold, Bushnell and Winslow. and Erastus Corning, came forward to the inventor's assistance, and it was mainly due to the capital furnished by these gentlemen that the Monitor was ready in time to meet the Merrimac. It is thus seen that, although there was a want of liberality in Congress, our private citizens were more generous, and would not let an invention which common-sense told them was invaluable, be lost for want of money, even though they ran the risk of losing all that they ventured. Men frequently occupy subordinate pos