Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. M. Corse or search for J. M. Corse in all documents.

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the Etowah, he would turn on him. When General Corse moved, it was yet uncertain as to Hood's iph wires having been cut by the enemy, for General Corse to move to Allatoona at once with his whol considerably delayed in returning. After General Corse's arrival, his reinforcements and the garra, to avoid a needless effusion of blood. General Corse instantly replied: We are prepared for thetention to the accompanying report of Brigadier-General Corse, which affords a full and graphic accn position, excepting that two brigades of General Corse's division crossed the river, and aided ththe way. The bridge was immediately laid. General Corse's division had arrived by this time; one brst and Second divisions. I accompanied General Corse, who found a good ridge road on the left bvision, General John E. Smith, closed upon General Corse at the canal. As soon as he was within surhaus with the right column, consisting of General Corse's division, followed by General Hazen on t[14 more...]
November 23, 1864. The Fourth division, Fifteenth corps, with bridge-train, having roads that were almost impassable, only reached the vicinity of Clinton at night. This morning, fifty-five to fifty-six mule-teams have been sent to assist the pontoon-train through. General Woods's division is moving up this way, abreast of General Corse; General Hazen moving toward Irwinton General Blair moving along the railroad, and destroying it. I propose, with your sanction, to move across the Oconee River at two points; one, six miles below the railroad bridge at Ball's Ferry; the other, two and a half miles above the railroad bridge at Jackson's Ferry. I have already forwarded to you despatches captured. Prisoners still estimate the strength of the enemy in our vicinity about ten thousand. The attack on Walcott was made, I think, by militia, mingled with some old troops retained at Macon. The number of prisoners of war in my hands: In the Seventeenth corps, thirty-five enlisted me
November 26. Generals Corse and Woods, Fifteenth army corps, reached this point, between nine and ten miles from the ferry, last night. Seventeenth corps massed near the fork of the road that leads to Station fourteen. The rear of the Fifteenth corps is now crossing. General Blair has sent a division that is destroying the railroad from Oconee bridge to a point near Irwin's Cross-Roads. General Osterhaus has sent a force to destroy the rest to Station thirteen. T directed the wagon bridges across Commissioners' Creek and the three bridges across Sandy River to be destroyed; the enemy helped me them-selves by destroying the one nearest the Oconee. The country this side of the river is quite open and sandy, but there is plenty of forage thus far. Wheeler, with his main force, passed here the day before yesterday. My headquarters will remain here to-day. Respectfully, O. O. Howard, Major-General.
November 30, 1864. Generals Woods and Corse's divisions pushed on through Summerville northward, till they reached the upper Savannah road, and encamped near Deep Creek. General Blair moved forward to Station No. 9 1/2, effecting a crossing of the Ogeechee; at that point he rebuilt the wagon bridge, partially destroyed, and also laid a pontoon-bridge across the river.
December 2. The column preserved the same order of march. General Blair reached Millen, having completely destroyed the railroad up to that point, including the large depot and considerable lumber, railroad ties, etc. The middle column encamped near Clifton's Ferry, having thrown a bridge over the Ogeechee at that point, and sent a brigade of General Corse's division to assist the Seventeenth corps in breaking up the railroad. In addition to the above, Scull's Creek, a wide stream, too deep to be forded, was carefully bridged in two places. Our scouting-parties hurried on to Scarborough, a little below, and seized a mail which gave us Savannah papers of that day.
December 3. The Fifteenth corps remained in position, excepting that two brigades of General Corse's division crossed the river, and aided the Seventeenth corps in destroying the railroad from Millen to Scarborough. The Seventeenth corps came up abreast, encamping near Station No. 7.
December 7. My command moved as follows: the First division, General Woods, remained at Wright's Bridge, except one brigade of infantry, that crossed the foot-bridge and marched down the east bank of the Ogeechee toward Eden Station. On the arrival of the pontoon at Jenks's Bridge. the Chief-Engineer, Captain C. B. Reese, finding the enemy on the other bank, threw over a regiment of Colonel Oliver's brigade and cleared the way. The bridge was immediately laid. General Corse's division had arrived by this time; one brigade, General Rice commanding, crossed over, met the enemy's skirmishers some five hundred yards beyond, drove them in, and routed a battalion of rebels behind rail-piles in a very handsome manner, capturing seventeen prisoners, and killing and wounding several more. We lost two killed and two or three wounded. This brigade then formed a junction with General Woods's brigade, from Wright's Bridge, at Eden Station. General Hazen's division moved on to Black C
on the right bank led; General Osterhaus in person conducted it with his First and Second divisions. I accompanied General Corse, who found a good ridge road on the left bank of the Big Ogeechee. We came upon some carefully constructed works som near the canal's mouth, called Dillen's Ferry, a mile and a half above, I found practicable for a pontoon-bridge. General Corse sent forward a reconnoissance which found the enemy in force at the junction of this road with the King's Bridge and h and Gulf Railroad at different points, and destroying it. The Third division, General John E. Smith, closed upon General Corse at the canal. As soon as he was within supporting distance, General Corse moved forward toward Savannah. He encountGeneral Corse moved forward toward Savannah. He encountered about six hundred rebel infantry with two pieces of artillery near the Cross-Roads. His advanced brigade quickly dislodged them, capturing one piece of artillery and several prisoners. He followed them up across the Little Ogeechee, and by my
December 10. The entire command closed in on the enemy's works which covered Savannah. General Osterhaus with the right column, consisting of General Corse's division, followed by General Hazen on the King's Bridge road, the central column, consisting of General John E. Smith's division, followed by General Woods, and the left, General Blair's corps, Major-General Mower's division in advance. These several columns struck the enemy's line simultaneously with the left wing of the army. The nature of the country was such as to render the approaches to that front extremely difficult. By means of the canal and the Little Ogeechee River he was able to flood the country; besides the great portion of the front was marshy with a deep stream winding through it under the cover of numerous batteries of the enemy. Pursuant to Special Field Order No. 130, from your headquarters, the army of the Tennessee simply gained ground to the right. With regard to opening communication with the f
rown forward as skirmishers on the left of the line, and companies A, F, and I were sent forward three hundred (300) yards to the right and front of the main line, to hold the crest of a hill, and discover any movements which the enemy might contemplate on our right flank, while companies E, G, and K were in the centre, holding hastily-constructed rifle-pits, with orders to maintain their position at all hazards. This was the disposition of the companies of the regiment at the time that General Corse sent to the rebel General French his refusal to surrender the town and his command. The engagement opened at nine o'clock A. M., between our skirmishers and those of the enemy. The latter immediately threw forward heavy bodies of infantry, but were held in check for some time by our advanced companies, and it was in the attempt of the enemy to drive back our right, that Lieutenant O. D. Russell, company C, received a painful wound in the breast while firmly maintaining his position. A