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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 7 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 17 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 13 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Corse or search for Corse in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 14: fall of 1862 (search)
, when completed, stood as follows, the strength being given from the returns of Nov. 20, 1862. Organization of army of Northern Va., Nov., 1862 1ST corps, Longstreet's DIVISIONBRIGADES and ARTILLERYPRESENT for duty McLaws'sKershaw's, Barksdale's, Cobb's, Semmes's, Cabell's Battalion Artillery, 4 Batteries, 18 Guns7,898 Anderson'sWilcox's, Mahone's, Featherstone's, Wright's, Perry's Unorganized Artillery, 4 Batteries, 18 Guns7,639 Pickett'sGarnett's, Kemper's, Armistead's, Jenkins's, Corse's Unorganized Artillery, 3 Batteries, 14 Guns7,567 Total23,104 1ST corps, Longstreet's (Continued) DIVISIONBRIGADES and ARTILLERYPRESENT for duty Hood'sTotal carried forward Law's, Robertson's, Anderson's, Benning's23,104 Unorganized Artillery, 3 Batteries, 14 Guns7,334 Walker's Ransom's, Cooke's, No Artillery3,855 Reserve ArtilleryAlexander's Battalion. 6 Batteries, 26 Guns623 Washington Artillery. 4 Batteries, 9 Guns Total5 Divisions, 20 Brigades 24 Batteries, 99 Guns29,916
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
pecial feature, which he hoped would play upon and exaggerate these fears. Two of Pickett's five brigades had been temporarily left,— Jenkins's at Petersburg, and Corse's at Hanover Junction. Lee proposed that when his column of invasion crossed the Potomac, these two brigades, reenforced by whatever could be drawn from lower Virn in effigy, under Beauregard, at Culpeper C. H. Meanwhile, some demonstrations by the enemy from the York River had excited apprehensions at Richmond, and neither Corse's or Jenkins's brigades were sent forward, as had been planned. A reply was despatched on June 29, saying,— This is the first intimation the President has spatch to join the right (Early) of the army in Pa. In view of the issues at stake, and of the fact that already he had been deprived of two promised brigades (Corse's and Jenkins's), it was unwise even to contemplate sending three brigades of cavalry upon such distant service. When one compares the small beneficial results of
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
ved to the attack. A wide depression in the ridge separated the portion of it which he occupied from that held by Bragg. Here, during the afternoon and night, Hardee had intrenched Cleburne's division and prepared to make a desperate stand. Sherman's men, fresh from Vicksburg, attacked with great vigor, and being repulsed, renewed the attack several times with no better success. Sherman, in his report, denies that they were repulsed, but says:— Not so. The real attacking columns of Gen. Corse, Col. Loomis, and Gen. Smith were not repulsed. They engaged in a close struggle all day, persistently, stubbornly, and well. This is one way of stating it. Their charges were all driven back, with losses more or less severe, to the nearest places affording cover. From these they kept up musketry fire, with little loss or execution, all the rest of the day. Some reenforcements sent on the flanks did similarly, and before three o'clock in the afternoon Sherman's whole force had been
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
iott's brigade reported the loss by the explosion as:— TOTALAGG. In 18th S. C. 4 companies86About 300 were blown up, but a small percentage escaped alive. In 22d S. C. 5 companies170 In Pegram's battery out of 30 Present 22278 Including these, Johnson reports the casualties in his division (Elliott, Wise, Ransom, Gracie), as follows:— Killed, 165; wounded, 415; missing, 359; Total, 938. There are no returns for Mahone's and Hoke's divisions. Hoke's division was composed of Corse's, Clingman's, Fulton's, Hagood's, and Colquitt's brigades, and Mahone's had only three brigades on the field,—Weiseger's, Wright's, and Sanders's. Of these eight brigades, only Weiseger's had serious losses, but there are no reports except for Colquitt's, who, like the rest of Hoke's division, held a portion of the line not attacked. His casualties were 4 killed and 27 wounded. The total Confederate loss is given in the Tabular Statement of the Medical Department as: 400 killed, 600 wounde<
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
urnout, and made demonstrations, but were easily held off by the artillery. Meanwhile, Lee had become very anxious over the non-arrival of Anderson's command (the remnants of Pickett's and Johnson's divisions), and at last rode to the rear to investigate. He did not return until near sundown and with him came fuller news of the battle at Sailor's Creek in which Anderson was also involved. Our loss had been about 8000 men, with six generals— Ewell, Kershaw, Custis Lee, Dubose, Hunton, and Corse—all captured. One notable affair had taken place on this date, between a small force under Gen. Read, sent ahead by Ord to burn the High Bridge on the Lynchburg road, and Dearing's and Rosser's cavalry. The expedition consisted of two regiments of infantry and about 80 cavalry. They had gotten within a mile of the bridge, when our cavalry, in much larger force, attacked them. Humphreys writes:— A most gallant fight ensued in which Gen. Read, Col. Washburn, and three other cavalry o<