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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for M. D. Corse or search for M. D. Corse in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
to press forward his right for the relief of his right centre, and he advanced Clingman with his remaining regiments and Corse with his brigade. He drove the enemy with spirit, suffering some loss; but the gap between Clingman and the troops on his left induced him to retire his command, to prevent being flanked, and reform it in the intermediate lines. Thus Corse became isolated, and learning from his officers that masses were forming against his right flank, he withdrew some distance baut not as far as his original position. These two brigades were not afterwards engaged, though they went to the front; Corse about one hour after he fell back, and Clingman at about 2.15 P. M. The enemy did not re-occupy the ground from which he e Yankee troops could give broke the stillness, and they surged towards us. Keep cool, men—don't fire yet, shouted Colonel Corse; and such was their perfect discipline that not a gun replied. But when the bayonets flashed above the hill-top the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
dvancing form came between the bead and the clear sky behind. The first thing we saw appear was the gilt eagle that surmounted the pole, then the top of the flag, next the flutter of the Stars and Stripes itself slowly mounting—up it rose; then their hats came in sight; still rising, the faces emerged; next a range of curious eyes appeared, then such a hurrah as only the Yankee troops could give broke the stillness, and they surged towards us. Keep cool, men—don't fire yet, shouted Colonel Corse; and such was their perfect discipline that not a gun replied. But when the bayonets flashed above the hill-top the forty-six muskets exploded at once, and sent a leaden shower full in the breasts of the attacking force, not over sixty yards distant. It staggered them—it was a murderous fire—and many fell; some of them struck for the rear, but the majority sent a stunning volley at us, and but for that fence there would have been hardly a man left alive. The rails, the posts, were sha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
e Board of Trustees and Faculty of Washington and Lee University; sixth, members of the Board of Visitors and Faculty of the Virginia Military Institute; seventh, specially invited guests; eighth, members of the Lee Memorial Association. Among the more notable persons present on the platform were Generals Wade Hampton, of South Carolina; J. A. Early, of Virginia; William Smith, (the last war Governor of Virginia); William Terry, of Wytheville, Virginia; George H. Steuart, of Maryland; M. D. Corse, R. D. Lilly, Fitzhugh Lee, G. W. Custis Lee, W. H. F. Lee and F. H. Smith, of Virginia; Judge H. W. Bruce, of Kentucky; Hon. C. R. Breckinridge, of Arkansas; Mrs. Stonewall Jackson and her daughter, Miss Julia; Mrs. J. E. B. Stuart and her daughter, Miss Virginia; Mrs. General George E. Pickett; Mrs. J. M. Carlisle, widow of General Anderson of Kentucky; E. V. Valentine the sculptor, and his wife; Mrs. General E. G. Lee; Mrs. Margaret J. Preston; Mrs. W. H. F. Lee and her two boys; Capta