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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 27 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clarke, George -1763 (search)
Clarke, George -1763 Colonial governor; born in England; came to America during the reign of Queen Anne; and settled in New York. When Governor Cosby died he was proclaimed governor pro tem. by the council, and later was commissioned lieutenant-governor by the British government. He died in Chester, England, in 1763.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cosby, William (search)
Cosby, William Governor; born about 1695; became a colonel in the British army; served as governor of Minorca, and of the Leeward Islands; and from 1731 till his death in New York City, March 10, 1736, was governor of New York. He was an exceedingly unpopular governor, largely through his contempt for the elective franchise, and continued one Assembly in office during the entire administration by refusing assent to its dissolution at the usual time.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, State of (search)
to 1691 Henry SloughterMarch 19, 1691 Richard IngoldsbyJuly 26, 1691 1692 Benjamin FletcherAug. 30, 1692 1698 Richard, Earl Bellomont1698 1701 John Nanfan 1701 to 1702 Lord CornburyMay 3, 1702 to 1708 John, Lord Lovelace Dec. 18, 1708 to 1709 Richard IngoldsbyMay 9, 1709to 1710 Gerardus BeekmanApril 10, 1710 Robert HunterJune 14, 1710 1719 Peter SchuylerJuly 21, 1719 to 1720 William Burnet Sept. 17, 1720to 1728 John MontgomeryApril 15, 1728 to 1731 Rip Van Dam 1731 to 1732 William CosbyAug. 1, 1732to 1736 George Clarke1736 1743 George ClintonSept. 2, 1743to 1753 Sir Sanvers OsborneOct. 10, 1753 James De LanceyOct. 12, 1853 to 1755 Sir Charles HardySept. 3, 1755to 1757 James De LanceyJune 3, 1757to 1760 Cadwallader ColdenAug. 4, 1760to 1761 Robert MoncktonOct. 26, 1761 Cadwallader ColdenNov. 18, 1761 to1765 Sir Henry MooreNov. 18, 1765 to 1769 Cadwallader ColdenSept. 12, 1769 to 1770 John Lord DunmoreOct. 19, 1770 to 1771 William TryonJuly 9, 1771 to 1777
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
ry with Connecticut established......May, 1731 Governor Montgomery dies......July 1, 1731 Rip Van Dam, acting governor......1731 [Population in the province of New York, 50,289; New York City, 8,632; total number of negroes, 7,231.] William Cosby, governor of New York, arrives......Aug. 1, 1732 First stage runs between New York and Boston, round trip twenty-eight days......1732 John Peter Zenger establishes the New York Weekly journal in the interests of the people......Nov. 5, 1733 Zenger arrested for libel and imprisoned thirty-five weeks......November, 1734 Andrew Hamilton, of Philadelphia, successfully defends Zenger......July, 1735 Governor Cosby dies......March 10, 1736 George Clarke, governor......1736 Law disfranchising Jews in New York......1738 Captain Norris, of the ship Tartar, lying in the harbor of New York, applies to the mayor for authority to impress thirty seamen. The governor and council order the mayor to assent; but he refuses,
Utica, A city and county seat of Oneida county, N. Y.; on the Mohawk River. The city is in the centre of a dairying region and is the chief cheese market of central New York. During the colonial period the site of the city was called Old Fort Schuyler, from the fort which stood there. It was a part of 22,000 acres given to William Cosby, the colonial governor, in 1734, after which date the tract was known as Cosby's manor. Population in 1900, 56,383. Utica, A city and county seat of Oneida county, N. Y.; on the Mohawk River. The city is in the centre of a dairying region and is the chief cheese market of central New York. During the colonial period the site of the city was called Old Fort Schuyler, from the fort which stood there. It was a part of 22,000 acres given to William Cosby, the colonial governor, in 1734, after which date the tract was known as Cosby's manor. Population in 1900, 56,383.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Van Dam, Rip 1662-1736 (search)
ed to the Assembly, where he led the opposition party; was appointed a member of the council and remained there for nearly thirty years; and was acting governor of New York from July 1, 1731, till Aug. 1, 1732. Shortly after the arrival of Gov. William Cosby a bitter dispute arose between him and Van Dam over an order which the governor exhibited for an equal division of perquisites and emoluments. Each sued the other, but no settlement was ever reached. Van Dam published Heads of complaint a member of the council and remained there for nearly thirty years; and was acting governor of New York from July 1, 1731, till Aug. 1, 1732. Shortly after the arrival of Gov. William Cosby a bitter dispute arose between him and Van Dam over an order which the governor exhibited for an equal division of perquisites and emoluments. Each sued the other, but no settlement was ever reached. Van Dam published Heads of complaint against Governor Cosby. He died in New York City some time after 1736.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Zenger, John Peter 1680-1746 (search)
rchant, senior member of the council, became, ex officio, chief magistrate of the province. William Cosby, a colonel in the royal army, was appointed governor, but did not arrive in New York until August, 1732, or thirteen months after the office became vacant. Cosby was rapacious, and cane to the colony to make money. His professions made the Assembly (in session at the time of his arrival)d the ruin of the commerce of the colony. Van Dam was a Democrat, and popular with the people. Cosby demanded one-half the salary which Van Dam had received during his presidency over the colony fonow, the Democratic party taking sides with Van Dam, and the Loyalist party— men of figure —with Cosby. At that time the venerable William Bradford was the government printer, and was publishing administration. Squibs, ballads, and serious charges that appeared in Zenger's Journal irritated Cosby and his council beyond endurance. On Nov. 2, 1734, the council ordered certain numbers of the J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
James P. Burgess, 4th Sergeant Loraine W. Griffin, Private Amos Bailey, Thomas Jenkins, Pinkney Martin, Private S. Owens Raymond, Samuel Harrill, James T. Splann, John Sutton, Aaron N. Wall. Co. E. Private Thomas Cosby, William Cosby, John W. Duckworth, John B. Giles, Private William Huffman, Robert P. Pearson, Henry Goens. Co. F. Private Moses M. Blackwell, John Auldred, Daniel W. Green, Private James E. Sluder, Ozias S. Wilson. Co. G. Corporal And Connell, Co. A, 44th N. C. Infantry. R. N. Bivins, Co. D, 37th N. C. Infantry. J. W. Brank, Co. F, 13th N. C. Infantry. A. J. Jones, Co. G, 1st N. C. Cav. J. H. Southern, Co. D, 21st N. C. Infantry. W. J. Cain, Co. E, 21st Ga. Infantry. W. Cosby, Co. B, 54th N. C. Infantry. D. Ingle, Co. K, 23d N. C. Infantry. J. M. C. Penninger, Co. G, 66th N. C. Infantry. G. H. Conly, Co. C, 24th Ga. Infantry. W. T. Barker, conscript assigned to light duty. A. Simmons, Co. G, 20th N. C. N. L.