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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
Cousin Nancy Julia was always young, though the Battle Hymn of the Republic was already written when the old lady charged her to cultivate a literary taste. On another occasion — it was one of the later visits — she said with emphasis, Julia, do not allow yourself to grow old! When you feel that you cannot do a thing, get up and do it Julia never forgot this advice. Cousin Nancy never read a novel in her life, as she announced with pride. She wished to read the Annals of the Schonberg-Cotta family, but, finding it to be a work of fiction, decided not to break her rule. She was a fond and pious mother; when her son needed chastisement, she would pray over him so long that he would cry out, Mother, it is time to begin whipping! If Julia Ward was part Ward and Greene, she was quite as much Cutler and Marion; it is to this descent that we must turn for the best explanation of her many-sided character. When she said of any relation, however distant, He is a Cutler! it meant
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: no. 13
Chestnut Street
, Boston 1864; aet. 45 (search)
ul, lying on a white couch in an attitude of perfect grace. We hear our mother's voice reciting the stately verses. We see her as the female Faust, first bending over her book, then listening entranced to the promises of Mephistopheles, finally vanishing behind a curtain from which the next instant sprang Florence (the one child who resembled her) in all the gayety of her bright youth. The next day she was, Very weary all day. Put things to rights as well as I could. Read in Spinoza, Cotta, and Livy. It was for the Brain Club that she wrote The Socio-Maniac, a cantata caricaturing fashionable society. She set the words to music, and sang with much solemnity the Mad song of the heroine whose brain had been turned by too much gayety:--Her mother was a Shaw, And her father was a Tompkins; Her sister was a bore, And her brother was a bumpkin; Oh! Soci-oh! Soci- Oh! Soci-e-ty! Her flounces were of gold, And her slippers were of ermine; And she looked a little bold When she
hilosophy, II, 118, 119, 120, 128. Constantinople, I, 345; II, 35, 42. Continental Congress, I, 4. Conway, M. D., I, 306. Cook's agency, II, 34, 41. Cookson, Mr., II, 170. Coolidge, Joseph, II, 313. Copperheads, I, 239. Coquelin, B. C., II, 288, 289. Coquerel, Athanase, I, 286; I, 315. Corday, Charlotte, I, 12. Cordes, Charlotte, I, 12. Corea, II, 91. Corfs, I, 272. Corne, Father, I, 53, 54. Corot, J. B. C., II, 172. Corse, Gen., II, 380. Cotta, J. F., I, 202. Council of Italian Women, II, 254, 255. Cowell, Mary, I, 13. Crabbe, George, I, 13. Cram, R. A., II, 156. Cramer, J. B., I, 43. Crawford, Annie, see Rabe. Crawford, Eleanor, II, 389. Crawford, F. Marion, I, 130, 254, 255, 362; II, 28, 31, 65, 69-71, 80, 81, 84, 240, 362, 376, 389. Crawford, Mrs. F. M., II, 240. Crawford, Harold, II, 240. Crawford, Louisa W., I, 18, 19, 30, 34, 35, 58, 59, 70, 78, 79, 95, 103, 115, 118, 130, 134. Letters to, I, 81,