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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
man — Divisions: Porter, Hooker, and Hamilton; Fourth Corps, Keyes — Divisions: Couch, Smith, and Casey. The reserve artillery (Henry J. Hunt), the regular infantrythe divisions of Franklin, Porter, Sykes, and Smith reached Cumberland Landing; Couch and Casey being near New Kent Court Clark's House, near Howe's saw-mill, Yorks, Heintzelman — Divisions, Kearny and Hooker; Fourth Corps, Keyes — Divisions, Couch and Casey; Fifth Corps, F. J. Porter — Divisions, Morell and Sykes and the Rese violent attack upon Casey's division, followed by an equally formidable one on Couch, thus commencing the battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines. Heintzelman came up ing the position between 9 and 10 A. M., and at 3 P. M. Made a sharp attack upon Couch's division, which remained lying on the ground until the enemy were within closSickles were sent from Sumner's and Heintzelman's Corps to reenforce Porter and Couch; fresh batteries were moved forward from the reserve artillery and the ammun
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.21 (search)
mpossible to advance, and I ordered the troops to halt and lie on their arms. General Hooker was delayed on the road so long that he did not reach the field until early on the morning of May 5th, when he found himself on the left of Smith's division, and in front of Fort Magruder. The position of the Union troops then was: Smith on the right, and Hooker on the left, confronting the enemy's works, the latter having the heaviest obstacle before him, and the divisions of Kearny, Casey, and Couch struggling on toward the front, over crowded, muddy roads. General Sumner says in his report: I had a careful reconnoissance made on the left of the enemy's works, on the morning of the 5th, and found two of their forts unoccupied. I immediately ordered General Hancock to advance with a brigade and ten pieces of artillery, and hold those works, it being my intention to force their left. This was about 11 A. M. Meantime, at 7:30 A. M., General Hooker, on his own responsibility, had
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Hiram G. Berry: 2d Mich., Col. Orlando M. Poe; 3d Mich., Col. Stephen G. Champlin; 5th Mich., Col. Henry D. Terry; 37th N. Y., Col. Samuel B. Hayman. Brigade loss: k, 69; w, 223; m, 7==299. Artillery, Capt. James Thompson: B, 1st N. J., Capt. John E. Beam; E, 1st R. I., Capt. George E. Randolph; G, 2d U. S., Capt. James Thompson. Fourth Army Corps, Brigadier-General Erasmus D. Keyes. Cavalry: 5th U. S., Major Joseph H. Whittlesey. first division, Brig.-Gen. Darius N. Couch. First Brigade, Col. Julius W. Adams: 65th N. Y. (1st U. S. Chasseurs), Lieut.-Col. Alexander Shaler; 67th N. Y. (1st Long Island), Lieut.-Col. Nelson Cross; 23d Pa., Col. Thomas H. Neill; 31st Pa., Col. David H. Williams; 61st Pa., Col. Oliver H. Rippey. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John J. Peck: 55th N. Y., Col. P. Regis de Trobriand; 62d N. Y., Col. John L. Riker; 93d Pa., Col. James M. McCarter; 98th Pa., Col. John F. Ballier; 102d Pa., Col. Thomas A. Rowley. Brigade loss': k,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
total Union loss was 2283, and Hooker's loss, 1575. See tables, p. 200.--Editors. But Kearny's, Couch's, and two-thirds of Smith's division, and Peck's brigade were engaged also; a loss of 528 is very small among so many. Peck's brigade (five regiments) belonged to Couch's division and was the only brigade of that division which took part in the battle. Five regiments of Kearny's division ( at last successful, and the enemy abandoned their intrenchments. Just then reenforcements from Couch's division came up, and an effort was made to recover the position. Bu t it was to no purpose; d Hill's troops, and the Federals were driven back to Seven Pines. Keyes's corps (Casey's and Couch's divisions) was united at Seven Pines and reinforced by Kearny's division, coming from Savage's thrown away by the enemy in his hurried retreat. In the camp occupied by General Casey and General Couch on Saturday, before the battle of Seven Pines, we found rebel caissons filled with ammunitio
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
., Lieut.-Col. Thomas W. Egan. Brigade loss: k, 23; w, 174; m, 10 =207. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Hiram G. Berry: 2d Mich., Col. Orlando M. Poe; 3d Mich., Col. S. G. Champlin (w), Lieut.-Col. A. A. Stevens; 5th Mich., Col. Henry D. Terry; 37th N. Y., Lieut-Col. Gilbert Riordan (temporarily), Col. Samuel B. Hayman. Brigade loss: k, 84; w, 344; m, 36 = 464. Fourth Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. E. D. Keyes. Cavalry, 8th Pa., Col. D. McM. Gregg. Loss: w, 2; m, 2 =4. first division, Brig.-Gen. D. N. Couch. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John J. Peck: 55th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Louis Thourot; 62d N. Y., Col. J. Lafayette Riker (k), Lieut.-Col. David J. Nevin; 93d N. Y., Col. J. M. McCarter (w), Capt. John E. Arthur; 102d Pa., Col. Thomas A. Rowley (w), Lieut.-Col. J. M. Kinkead. Brigade loss: k, 47; w, 236; m, 64 = 347. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John J. Abercrombie: 65th N. Y. (1st U. S. Chasseurs), Col. John Cochrane; 67th N. Y. (1st Long Island), Col. Julius W. Adams;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
relieve the pressure on Casey's front. Before Couch could get into position Casey's line was carriecame engaged with the two regiments under General Couch, previously referred to. The latter says: and are heavier than in any other regiment in Couch's division. He adds that, after Couch was Couch was thrown back, Neill's regiment took part in the hard fighting which closed the day near the Seven Pill. Immediately after being thus cut off, General Couch communicated with Birney's brigade on the ut one thousand yards north of Fair Oaks, General Couch was informed that the leading troops of Sumner's corps were closely approaching. Couch halted his forces, formed line of battle, facing nearays: On arriving on the field, I found General Couch with four regiments and two companies of ig the overflowed Grapevine Bridge to reenforce Couch at Fair Oaks. [see map, P. 226.] from a sketccross the railroad to Longstreet's assistance, Couch would have been beaten and his battery capture[13 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
ade loss: k, 28; w, 225, m, 176 == 429. Artillery: E, 1st R. I., Capt. George E. Randolph; G, 2d U. S., Capt. James Thompson. Artillery loss: k, 2; w, 16; m, 5==23. reserve artillery, Capt. Gustavus A. De Russy: 6th N. Y., Capt. Walter M. Bramhall; 2d N. J., Capt. John E. Beam (k), Lieut. John B. Monroe; K, 4th U. S., Lieut. Francis W. Seeley. Loss: k, 1; w, 3; m, 1 == 5. Fourth Corps, Brig.-Gen. Erasmus D. Keyes. Cavalry: 8th Pa., Col. David McM. Gregg. first division, Brig.-Gen. Darius N. Couch. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Albion P. Howe: 55th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Louis Thourot; 62d N. Y., Col. David J. Nevin; 93d Pa., Capt. John S. Long; 98th Pa., Col. John F. Ballier; 102d Pa., Col. Thomas A. Rowley. Brigade loss: k, 27; w, 148; m, 33==208. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John J. Abercrombie: 65th N. Y. (lst U. S. Chasseurs), Lieut.-Col. Alexander Shaler; 67th N. Y. (1st Long Island), Lieut.-Col. Nelson Cross; 23d Pa., Col. Thomas H. Neill; 31st Pa., Col. David 11. Williams; 6
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan's change of base and Malvern Hill. (search)
ther with one or two assaults upon the west side of the Crew Hill from the meadow. Morell's and Couch's divisions formed the first Union line, and General Porter's batteries extended from the Crew h advanced alone against the Federal positions. . . . He had therefore before him Morell's right, Couch's division, reenforced by Caldwells brigade, . . and finally the left of Kearny. The woods skirpierce the line, sometimes at one point, sometimes at another, charging Kearny's left first, and Couch's right, . . . and afterward throwing themselves upon the left of Couch's division, But, here alCouch's division, But, here also, after nearly reaching the Federal positions, they are repulsed. The conflict is carried on with great fierceness on both sides, and, for a moment, it seems as if the Confederates are at last aboBut Sumner, who commands on the right, detaches Sickles's and Meagher's brigades successively to Couch's assistance. During this time, Whiting on the left, and Huger on the right, suffer Hill's sold
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
el R. 0. Tyler's Connecticut siege artillery, Couch's division of Keyes's corps, the brigades of J D. E. Sickles of Heintzelman's corps. Though Couch was placed under my command, he was left uncon of Butterfield's brigade, between Griffin and Couch, and the transfer of batteries from Morell to the place of Caldwell's, which had come up to Couch's aid and had suffered severely. Meagher advaon in the order named to the right and rear of Couch's division, protecting that flank effectively should be needed or called for. He sent it to Couch at an opportune moment early in the day. Geour, and approved my measures and those of General Couch, or changed them where it was deemed advisand Hazlitt's regular batteries of Parrotts on Couch's right. The service here was admirable. Wat specified hours to Harrison's Landing and General Couch to rejoin his corps, which was then under valry engaged with us at Gaines's Mill, nor of Couch's division and the brigades of Caldwell, Meagh[15 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The rear-guard at Malvern Hill. (search)
ion of the transportation of the army having been started for Harrison's Landing during the night of the 30th of June and the 1st of July, the order for the movement of the troops was at once issued upon the final repulse of the enemy at Malvern Hill. The order prescribed a movement by the left and rear, General Keyes's corps to cover the manoeuvre. It was not carried out in detail as regards the divisions on the left, the roads being somewhat blocked by the rear of our trains. Porter and Couch were not able to move out as early as had been anticipated, and Porter found it necessary to place a rear-guard between his command and the enemy. Colonel Averell, of the 3d Pennsylvania Cavalry, was intrusted with this delicate duty. He had under his command his own regiment and Lieutenant-Colonel Buchanan's brigade of regular infantry and one battery. By a judicious use of the resources at his command, he deceived the enemy so as to cover the withdrawal of the left wing without being at
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