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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Philip Courtenay or search for Philip Courtenay in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
romise me that you will come on Sunday night, and I will have all the literary characters of London. I will trot them all out for your benefit. Accordingly, there were Sam Rogers, —just returned with renewed youth from Paris,—Kenyon, Hayward, Courtenay Philip Courtenay; M. P. for Bridgewater; Queen's counsel on the Northern Circuit. (the M. P. and great London epicure), and his beautiful daughter; Westmacote Young, the retired actor, Young (Ubiquity), Mr. and Mrs. Yates, Quin, and Mrs. ShePhilip Courtenay; M. P. for Bridgewater; Queen's counsel on the Northern Circuit. (the M. P. and great London epicure), and his beautiful daughter; Westmacote Young, the retired actor, Young (Ubiquity), Mr. and Mrs. Yates, Quin, and Mrs. Shelley. We had excellent music. I talked a good deal with Mrs. Shelley. She was dressed in pure white, and seemed a nice and agreeable person, with great cleverness. She said the greatest happiness of a woman was to be the wife or mother of a distinguished man. I was not a little amused at an expression that broke from her unawares, she forgetting that I was an American. We were speaking of travellers who violated social ties, and published personal sketches, and she broke out, Thank God! I
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
any: our host and his wife,—one of the most beautiful women I have ever seen; Courtenay, Philip Courtenay; Queen's counsel, belonging to the Northern Circuit. SuPhilip Courtenay; Queen's counsel, belonging to the Northern Circuit. Sumner dined with him at 23 Montague Street, Russell Square. M. P., and his beautiful daughter; Eastlake, the accomplished artist; and Lord Brougham. Then the house waing-room is painted in imitation of a room of Pompeii. You may not know that Courtenay is the great epicure of London. His taste in matters of the table is reputedterly Review, to which I first called Chantrey's attention. I have spoken of Courtenay as the great gastronomer; I shall not neglect to add that he is as good a schAlderson and Williams; and when I quoted an out-of-the-way line from Juvenal, Courtenay at once gave the next one. Indeed, in the fine English society you will be sunion that in Brougham! I have met few men who seemed such critics of food. Courtenay had been in Germany; and Brougham said to Miss C., I understand you have been
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
any: our host and his wife,—one of the most beautiful women I have ever seen; Courtenay, Philip Courtenay; Queen's counsel, belonging to the Northern Circuit. SuPhilip Courtenay; Queen's counsel, belonging to the Northern Circuit. Sumner dined with him at 23 Montague Street, Russell Square. M. P., and his beautiful daughter; Eastlake, the accomplished artist; and Lord Brougham. Then the house waing-room is painted in imitation of a room of Pompeii. You may not know that Courtenay is the great epicure of London. His taste in matters of the table is reputedterly Review, to which I first called Chantrey's attention. I have spoken of Courtenay as the great gastronomer; I shall not neglect to add that he is as good a schAlderson and Williams; and when I quoted an out-of-the-way line from Juvenal, Courtenay at once gave the next one. Indeed, in the fine English society you will be sunion that in Brougham! I have met few men who seemed such critics of food. Courtenay had been in Germany; and Brougham said to Miss C., I understand you have been