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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cowan or search for Cowan in all documents.

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y-ninth day of November, 1864, while on the above duty at Chattanooga, Tennessee, an order was received from Major-General Steedman to move that day by rail, all available force. A portion of the garrison at Tunnel Hill was withdrawn, and, with the Eighteenth Ohio volunteers from this post, was added to my command. November 30, 1864. Reached Cowan Station at eight o'clock A. M.; disembarked the command and bivouacked. December 1. Shipped the command by rail during the night and left Cowan about daylight. Reached Nashville at five P. M., and went into camp in the eastern suburbs of the city. December 2. Moved to the hills near Raine's house and built a strong line of fortifications and a redoubt for the Twentieth Indiana battery (Captain Osborn commanding), which was upon service with my command this day. December 3. In compliance with orders from Major-General Steedman, I abandoned the works built the day previous and fell back to a line indicated, nearer the city.
December 1. Shipped the command by rail during the night and left Cowan about daylight. Reached Nashville at five P. M., and went into camp in the eastern suburbs of the city.
emiscot and Duncan counties, Arkansas, killing considerable numbers of them. We had quite a brisk running fight at Osceola, Arkansas, on the second instant, with Bowen's and McVaigh's companies, of Shelby's command. We captured their camp, killing seven, and took twenty-five prisoners, including Captain Bowen, their commander. On the fourth, at Elksehula, we fought the Second Missouri rebel cavalry, and Conyer's Guthrie's and Darnell's bands of guerrillas, all under the command of Colonel Cowan. We routed them completely, killed and mortally wounded about thirty, and slightly wounded (those who escaped in the swamps, as I am informed by prisoners subsequently captured), between thirty and forty, and took twenty-eight prisoners. We lost Captain Francis, Third cavalry, Missouri State Militia, mortally wounded, and two others slightly wounded. We have killed in all full fifty rebel soldiers and bushwhackers, including one Captain and three Lieutenants, wounded between thirty
sary Departments. This latter force, aided by railroad employes, the whole under the direction of Brigadier-General Tower, worked assiduously to construct additional defenses. Major-General Steedman, with a command numbering five thousand men, composed of detachments belonging to General Sherman's column, left behind at Chattanooga (of which mention has heretofore been made), and also a brigade of colored troops, started from Chattanooga by rail on the twenty-ninth of November, and reached Cowan on the morning of the thirtieth, where orders were sent him to proceed direct to Nashville. At an early hour on the morning of the thirtieth, the advance of Major-General A. J. Smith's command reached Nashville by transports from St. Louis. My infantry force was now nearly equal to that of the enemy, although he still outnumbered me very greatly in effective cavalry, but as soon as a few thousand of the latter arm could be mounted, I should be in a condition to take the field offensively,
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 59. battles of Spottsylvania, Va: battle of Sunday, May 8, 1864. (search)
Colonel Upton. It consisted of a portion of the First division, the Vermont brigade of the Second division, and some picked troops of General Neill's command, who were massed, on the eve of the attack, to the left and front of three batteries — Cowan's, McCartney's, and Rhodes'. Some companies of the Forty-ninth New York regiment had occupied during the afternoon a work in advance of the general line, and just to the left of the line of march of the column of attack. As the column pressed forward, these companies moved by the left flank, engaging a battery of the enemy on the right of his work. The batteries of McCartney, Cowan, and Rhodes opened on the work, over the heads of the attacking column, which moved steadily on in the face of a terrific blaze of musketry, with arms a-port, and without firing a shot, up to the very face of the enemy's position. It poured, a flood of savage faces and plunging bayonets, over the crest of the work and into the midst of the enemy, capturin
neously with the attack of the Second corps, the Sixth, under Wright, connecting on the left with Hancock, made a general advance at a quarter before five o'clock--each division assaulting on the entire line. Of this corps, the Second division (McNeill), held the right; the Third division (Ricketts), the centre, and the First division (Russell), the left. Five batteries, under charge of the Chief of Artillery of the Second corps, Colonel Tompkins, namely: Adams' First Rhode Island battery, Cowan's First New York (Independent), Hahn's Third New York (Independent), McCurtin's First Massachusetts, and Rhodes' First Rhode Island, were planted in good positions, and did effective service in covering the advance. The assault of the Sixth corps was made with the utmost vigor, and succeeded in carrying the first line of rebel rifle-pits along its entire front, and got up within two hundred and fifty yards of the main works. Smith's corps, connecting on the right with the Sixth, had advanc