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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 7 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Cowan or search for Cowan in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 1 document section:

that it was the policy of the South not to teach the slaves. Mr. Cowan, (Rep.,) of Pa., said that he had a very slight acquaintance with the opposed him in his political dogmas. He (Mr. Cowan) was as much in favor of putting down the rebellion as any one. He claimed that in d levied war against the Government, and they were traitors. Mr. Cowan replied that if it could be proved that it was the intention of M, and was willing to take any means whatever to put it down. He (Mr. Cowan) understood that Mr. Bright belonged to the party which did not bment formed there could be no harm in sending such a letter. He (Mr. Cowan) thought that did not amount to much, as it was simply following the example of the circle in which he (Mr. Bright) moved. He (Mr. Cowan) was willing to admit that the writing of such a letter was a great ight have looked at the matter from another stand- point, and he (Mr. Cowan) was not willing to affix the stigma of treason from such doubtfu