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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Jonathan T. Cowan or search for Jonathan T. Cowan in all documents.

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were compelled to accept either one or the other of two alternatives, namely, to go into the confederate army or be hanged. He was also the principal of a large female seminary in Winchester, which seems to be still in full operation, educating the feminine youth of the locality in the arts, sciences, and philosophies of the heresy of secessionism. Trimble was subsequently sent to Gen. Mitchel, at Huntsville. Passing through Winchester, Gen. Negley encamped his forces at a place called Cowan, on the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, and on a branch of a tributary of the Tennessee River. The trestle-work of the railroad bridge at this point was found to have been burned by the rebels, but the stream was easily fordable, and it was crossed on Wednesday morning, June fourth, and the line of march resumed toward Jasper, Marion County. Here Gen. Negley caused several of the most prominent secessionists to be arrested, and mulcted them in the sum of two hundred dollars each, which
tered in every direction, being completely routed and broken up. I continued to fire several rounds into Waddell's building, and then advanced upon it with Capt. Blakemore's company. I then filled my thirty-six wagons with corn and bacon, and returned to this place, arriving after dark. Capt. Cameron behaved with the greatest gallantry, as did his company K, Ninth regiment Illinois cavalry. I must particularly recommend to your notice the conduct of Major Humphrey, Captains Cameron, Cowan, Blakemore and Perkins; Lieuts. Benton, Hillier, Shear, Conn, Butler and Smith, and First Sergeant Clark, of the Ninth Illinois cavalry, and Capt. Williams, Lieuts. Madison and Ballou, and First Sergeant Miller, of Bowen's cavalry battalion. My thanks are due to Surgeon Jas. A. Brackett, for his care of the wounded, and to Battalion-Adjutant Blackburne, Quartermaster Price, and Sergeant-Major George A. Price, Ninth Illinois cavalry. The enemy lost twenty-eight in killed, wounded and
e with the views of the President of the confederate States, and that the President be assured that whatever destruction and loss of property of the State or individuals shall thereby result, will be cheerfully submitted to. Resolved, That a committee of two on the part of the Senate and three on the part of the House be appointed to communicate the adoption of the foregoing resolution to the President. A copy from the rolls. Teste, Wm. F. Gordon, Jr., O. H. D. and K. of R. By Jno. T. Cowan, Deputy. On the fifteenth instant the joint committee made the following report: The joint committee, appointed by the two houses to communicate to the President of the confederate States the joint resolutions of the General Assembly in relation to the defence of the city, have discharged the duty confided to them, and respectfully report that their interview with the President was in the highest degree satisfactory, and his views, as communicated with entire frankness to the co
e with the views of the President of the confederate States, and that the President be assured that whatever destruction and loss of property of the State or individuals shall thereby result, will be cheerfully submitted to. Resolved, That a committee of two on the part of the Senate and three on the part of the House be appointed to communicate the adoption of the foregoing resolution to the President. A copy from the rolls. Teste, Wm. F. Gordon, Jr., O. H. D. and K. of R. By Jno. T. Cowan, Deputy. On the fifteenth instant the joint committee made the following report: The joint committee, appointed by the two houses to communicate to the President of the confederate States the joint resolutions of the General Assembly in relation to the defence of the city, have discharged the duty confided to them, and respectfully report that their interview with the President was in the highest degree satisfactory, and his views, as communicated with entire frankness to the co
n to move forward with his brigade, accompanied by Barnett's battery from Illinois. It was nearly dawn when they arrived within sight of the position they were to occupy, but the moon was still shining brightly, and as they approached the bottom of the hill they could distinctly see the rebel pickets upon the crest. The Eighty-fifth Illinois, Colonel Moore, was immediately deployed upon the right of the road, the front and flank covered by skirmishers, and the Fifty-second Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Cowan commanding, was similarly deployed upon the left. The One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Illinois, Colonel Harmon, was posted as a reserve one hundred and fifty paces in the rear, (the Eighty-sixth Illinois had previously been detailed on picket-duty.) Our skirmishers had hardly taken intervals before the enemy's pickets opened a sharp fire, especially upon the Eighty-fifth Illinois. Although the first fight in which they had ever been engaged, the troops moved forward at the word of