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ed him beyond any haphazard pursuit. He crossed the Navy-Yard bridge and rode into Maryland, being joined very soon by Herold. The assassin and his wretched acolyte came at midnight to Mrs. Surratt's tavern, and afterward pushed on through the moonlight to the house of an acquaintance of Booth, a surgeon named Mudd, who set Booth's leg and gave him a room, where he rested until evening, when Mudd sent them on their desolate way south. After parting with him they went to the residence of Samuel Cox near Port Tobacco, and were by him given into the charge of Thomas Jones, a contraband trader between Maryland and Richmond, a man so devoted to the interests of the Confederacy that treason and murder seemed every-day incidents to be accepted as natural and necessary. He kept Booth and Herold in hiding at the peril of his life for a week, feeding and caring for them in the woods near his house, watching for an opportunity to ferry them across the Potomac; doing this while every wood-path
765, leaving his whole estate to his wife; Simon, 24 July 1741; Daniel, 7 Aug. 1743, m. Lydia Mullett 9 May 1764; Solomon, 9 Feb. 1745-6; Lydia, 24 Ap. 1748, m. Samuel Cox 16 Nov. 1768. Jona-than the f. d. in Chs. 1766, prob. in that portion near Porter's, which is now embraced in Camb., and formerly called Cooper's Corner. 8e corporation ordered, that the Treasurer of the College do pay to Mrs. Belshar for wine of her received and expended at the funeral of Mr. Ammi-Ruhamah Corlett. Cox, Matthew, m. Elizabeth, dau. of Walter Russell (pub. 30 Mar. 1739), and had Elizabeth. bap. 20 Jan. 1739-40, m. Henry Dickson 24 July 1766; Agnes, bap. 1 Mar. 1740, b. 22 May 1761, settled in Keene, N. H.; Sarah, b. 15 Mar. 1763, m. Jonathan Stone of Watertown; Rebecca, b. 3 June 1765, m.——Morgan; Fanny, b. 4 May 1767, m. Samuel Cox 14 Mar. 1793, and d. 27 Ap. 1855; Samuel, b. 18 Nov. 1769; Joseph, b. 23 Oct. 1772, settled in Putney, Vt. Daniel the f. was a currier, and resided on the nort
Samuel, 18 Feb. 1738-9, pub. to Hannah Geohegan of Chs. 19 Mar. 1763, and d. Sept. 1765, leaving his whole estate to his wife; Simon, 24 July 1741; Daniel, 7 Aug. 1743, m. Lydia Mullett 9 May 1764; Solomon, 9 Feb. 1745-6; Lydia, 24 Ap. 1748, m. Samuel Cox 16 Nov. 1768. Jona-than the f. d. in Chs. 1766, prob. in that portion near Porter's, which is now embraced in Camb., and formerly called Cooper's Corner. 8. John, s. of John (3), m. Hannah Johnson 21 Oct. 1725, and had John, b. 22 Jan. 172 probably engaged as one of the instructors until he d. unm. 1 Feb. 1678-9; for the corporation ordered, that the Treasurer of the College do pay to Mrs. Belshar for wine of her received and expended at the funeral of Mr. Ammi-Ruhamah Corlett. Cox, Matthew, m. Elizabeth, dau. of Walter Russell (pub. 30 Mar. 1739), and had Elizabeth. bap. 20 Jan. 1739-40, m. Henry Dickson 24 July 1766; Agnes, bap. 1 Mar. 1740-41, m. James Phillips 14 May 1778; Walter, bap. 7 Oct. 1744; Samuel, bap. 28 Sept.
ge. In his death, the family have to lament an affectionate husband, and an indulgent parent; and the public to regret the loss of a useful member of society. His w. Lucy survived. 11. Daniel, s. of Abraham (5), m. Anna, dau. of Capt. John Tainter of Watertown, 24 Nov. 1757, and had Anna, b. 2 Ap. 1759, d. 27 Sept. 1767; Daniel, b. 22 May 1761, settled in Keene, N. H.; Sarah, b. 15 Mar. 1763, m. Jonathan Stone of Watertown; Rebecca, b. 3 June 1765, m.——Morgan; Fanny, b. 4 May 1767, m. Samuel Cox 14 Mar. 1793, and d. 27 Ap. 1855; Samuel, b. 18 Nov. 1769; Joseph, b. 23 Oct. 1772, settled in Putney, Vt. Daniel the f. was a currier, and resided on the northwesterly corner of North Avenue and Russell Street. He d. of palsy 26 Ap. 1805; his w. Anna d. 11 Jan. 1823, a. 89. 12. Jacob, s. of Jacob (8), m. Mehetabel Skinner of Woburn (pub. 25 Jan. 1761), and had Jacob, b. 3 Sept. 1765; Mehetabel, b. 10 Sept. 1767, m. Adino Hastings 21 June 1795; he d. 8 Jan. 1798, and she m. Thomas Has
e is now a well-known public spirited gentleman, residing in Boston. Warrior—son of—a negro—b. 7 June, d. 10 June, 1741, a. 3 days. Margaret (perhaps Warrow, so called), d. 16 Dec. 1754. [Daniel Worrow, estate taxed 1737, 1742, in Chas.—named by Wyman, 1050.] Watson, Abraham, m. Mary Butterfield, 4 Jan. 1750—fee 48 shillings. Mrs. Mary d. 4 Mar. 1789, a. 93. Isaac, of Medford, m. Ruth Locke, 26 Sept. 1771. Lydia, of Camb., m. Thomas Shepherd, of Worcester, 25 Nov. 1790. Fanny, m. Samuel Cox, 14 Mar. 1793. See Paige, 679, 680; Wyman, 1000, 1001. Watts, Sarah, dau. of John Fillebrown, d. 18 Dec. 1745, a. 42. Samuel, of Woburn, m. Susanna Swan, 4 Apr. 1757. Webb, Elizabeth, m. Nathaniel Fessenden, 20 June, 1771. Sa-Rah (her sister), of Medford, bap. here 4 Oct. 1772, aet. 18. Webber, Jotham, m. Elizabeth Russell, Jr., 12 Mar. 1778. Had Jotham, b. 25 Dec. 1778, bap. 3 Jan. 1779. Elizabeth was dism. from this ch. to the ch. in Mason, 19 Sept. 1790. Mary Ann E.
rounded them. This he saw. He says the loss must have been very heavy. There are no troops here. A company came down in the Mount Vernon from Washington yesterday. They caught a negro at the landing and forced him to conduct them to Captain Samuel Cox's house, which they searched. Captain Cox told them that he had a decided objection to their proceedings, but as they were too strong, he intended to make no resistance. They were civil as possible, under the circumstances, and did no damCaptain Cox told them that he had a decided objection to their proceedings, but as they were too strong, he intended to make no resistance. They were civil as possible, under the circumstances, and did no damage. They afterwards bought a sheep, which they concluded to slaughter with bullets. They finally succeeded, on firing the twentieth volley. Worse shooting cannot be imagined. The steamer St. Nicholas was boarded in St. Mary's river on Saturday last. Boxes were broken open and bales ripped, but no trunks were disturbed It was, of course, the work of some scrub. The Navy officers give us no trouble. It is the civilian "muffs," who infest the river with every description of small craft
h section of chapter 58 of the Code of Virginia. All of the above bills passed their first reading. Laid on the Table.--The bill providing for the voluntary enslavement of Walker Fitch, a free negro of Staunton, Va., being on its third reading, was opposed by Messrs. Jones of G., and Haymond, for the reason that it transferred the jurisdiction of the Circuit Courts in such cases to the County Courts. It was laid on the table. Petitions, &c.--Mr. Morris presented the petition of Samuel Cox and others, for an act to take the sense of the voters of Marshall county upon the repeal of the act providing for opening and keeping in repair the county roads in the county of Marshall, passed January 6th, 1854; the same gentleman also presented the remonstrance of Arthur C. Masling and others, against the repeal of the road law in Marshall county; Mr. Collier presented the petition of citizens of Petersburg, asking certain changes in the law regulating assemblages of free negroes.