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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 11 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
. Wells as Vice President? At this meeting, as at divers local anti-slavery meetings,—the first of their respective organizations since the mob of October 21,—Mr. Garrison's hands were naturally upheld by resolutions of praise and confidence. To the censorious comments of the religious press on such tributes he replied: I have not solicited the applause of Lib. 6.59. any man, or body of men; nor have I spared any man or body of men—not even my generous benefactor, Arthur Tappan, or Samuel H. Cox, or Gerrit Smith, or William Ellery Channing—for the sake of preserving or enlarging my reputation. With no one of these had he dealt more faithfully or severely than with Gerrit Smith, as to no other had he more liberally granted space in the Liberator for counter criticism of himself and of the antislavery movement. George Benson writes to his son Henry, at Providence, February 13, 1836: Your brother Ms. Garrison had a letter yesterday with a check from Gerrit Smith (for thirty dol
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
be to warn the young Friends not to fall into the Hicksite heresy. He is, in his personal appearance, a fine specimen of English corporosity, having a fair round belly, with good capon lined. During his long and tedious harangue, he stood fixed like a statue, with his hands lazily flung behind him, and singing his badly enunciated words in the usual absurd and unnatural manner of Quaker preachers. Although he was a flaming abolitionist in England, he has acted in this country very much as Cox and Hoby did, having scarcely opened his lips since his Ante, 1.480. arrival on the subject of slavery. He is very staid and formal in his movements, and, on sitting down at the conclusion of his discourse, manifested as much care as if he had a score of eggs under him. I went with bro. Wright, this morning, to see him; May 12, 1838. but, anticipating a visit from me, he obviously chose to be absent, and so our call was in vain. He leaves the city to-day. When will England send us anothe
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
called for by the people that he stepped forward, and bore a faithful testimony against the unfaithfulness of the friends of the cause who went to America, and did not do their duty on that subject while there; especially Joseph John Gurney, Drs. Cox, Hoby, &c. He spoke fearlessly of the conduct of the Committee in calling such a Convention, and then denying it; also of war, and of woman slavery, which had been exercised over the female delegates. Our new organizers made no reply. Several ele more like New Englanders in their appearance and manners. I was exceedingly pleased with the Irish friends I saw in Dublin, and received from them a welcome most cordial and ardent. which the patient reader may contrast with the behavior of Drs. Cox and Hoby in the United Ante, 1.480. States, was rewarded by the subsequent distribution, as a Chartist handbill, of a reproachful letter addressed to Lib. 10.203. Mr. Garrison by Charles McEwan. He was charged, after having read the former hand
. S. Soc., 415, member of Exec. Com., 483.—Letter to G., 1.433. Brother of S. H. C. Cox, F. A., Rev., dodges abolitionists in U. S., 1.480, 481; 2.212, 401; at Faneuil Hall meeting, 1.481, 497; censured by Thompson, 2.83, by G., 384. Cox, Samuel Hanson, Rev. [b. Rahway, N. J., Aug. 25, 1793; d. Bronxville, N. Y., Oct., 1880], literary style, 1.461; mobbed, 461, burnt in effigy, 485; criticised by G., 2.87. Cradle of Liberty, founded, 2.284, circulation, 331. Cranch, Christopher Pearce r and mobs, 452, 516-520, 2.2-4, 6; shut out of Boston halls, 1.453; aid to Lib., 1.434, 2.279; as to meeting Channing, 1.466; opposes Am. Union for the Relief, etc., 469; labors at Andover, 474, 2.2, 3; forms Methodist A. S. Soc., 1.477; rebukes Cox and Hoby, 481; course described by J. Q. Adams, 487; marked for assassination, 490, 517, 2.4, and kidnapping, 1.49, 519, 2.3; to Lynn with G., 1.491; assailed by P. Sprague, 497, 510, 516; gives up house to G., 502; rumored movements, 517; gallows
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
do, and be wise. Worldly-wise they were in going without Lib. 16:[154], [155]. their dinners and retiring to pray, with the reward of seeing the motion temporarily withdrawn. However, the Rev. F. A. Cox, trusting to his transatlantic experience Ante, 1.480. in trimming, thought to ease matters by proposing that the Hinton resolution and others on the same subject be referred to a committee, on which, of course, America was well represented. On August 29, they reported, through the Rev. Samuel Hanson Cox, who had long since Ante, 1.461, 485. abandoned the abolition ranks in the time of the sectarian division. See his resentment (before the New School General Assembly at Philadelphia in June, 1846) at the republication of a letter of his dated Auburn, N. Y., Feb. 10, 1836, and addressed to a brother minister, in which he hesitated not a moment to say that, other things being equal, a slaveholder of any description ought to be excluded from the communion of the churches (Lib. 1