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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cox, Samuel Sullivan 1824-1889 (search)
Cox, Samuel Sullivan 1824-1889 Statesman; born in Zanesville, O., Sept. 30, 1824: graduated at Brown University in 1846: became editor of the Statesman of Columbus, O., in 1853; was a Democratic Representative in Congress from Ohio in 1857-65; and from New York in 1868-82. During his service in Congress he secured an increase of salary for the letter-carriers throughout the country, and also an annual vacation without loss of pay. In 1885-86 he was United States minister to Turkey, and on his return was again elected to Congress. He was a pleasing speaker, writer, and lecturer. Chief among his many publications are Puritanism in politics; Eight years in Congress; Free land and free trade; Three decades of federal legislation; and The diplomat in Turkey. He died in New York City, Sept. 10, 1889.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Franklin, battle of. (search)
north bank of the river, and Fort Granger, on a bluff, commanded the gently rolling plain over which Hood must advance in a direct attack. Schofield had about 18,000 men. At four Battle-field of Franklin o'clock on the afternoon of Nov. 30, 1864, Hood advanced to the attack with all his force. A greater part of his cavalry, under Forrest, was on his right, and the remainder were on his left. The Confederates fell fiercely upon Schofield's centre, composed of the divisions of Ruger and Cox, about 10,000 strong. Their sudden appearance was almost a surprise. Schofield was at Fort Granger, and the battle, on the part of the Nationals, was conducted by General Stanley. By a furious charge Hood hurled back the Union advance in utter confusion upon the main line, when that, too, began to crumble. A strong position on a hill was carried by the Confederates, where they seized eight guns. They forced their way within the second line and planted a Confederate flag upon the intrench
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Goldsboro, Junction of National armies at. (search)
ed from Wilmington northward, towards Goldsboro, towards which the Nationals ruder Schofield were pressing. It was at the railroad crossing of the Neuse River. General Cox, with 5,000 of Palmer's troops, crossed from Newbern and established a depot of supplies at Kingston, after a moderate battle on the way with Hoke. Perceiving the Confederate force to be about equal to his own, Schofield ordered Cox to intrench and wait for expeted reinforcements. On March 10, 1865, Hoke pressed Cox and attacked hint, but was repulsed with severe loss—1,500 men. The Nationals lost about 300. The Confederates fled across the Neuse, and Schofield entered Goldsboro on theCox and attacked hint, but was repulsed with severe loss—1,500 men. The Nationals lost about 300. The Confederates fled across the Neuse, and Schofield entered Goldsboro on the 20th. Then Terry, who had been left at Wilmington, joined Schofield (March 22), and the next day Sherman arrived there. Nearly all the National troops in North Carolina were encamped that night around Goldsboro. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, with the combined and concentrated forces of Beauregard, Hardee, Hood, the garrison from Au
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
an American schooner, suspected of conveying men and arms from New York to the insurgents in Cuba, is captured by the Spanish gunboat Tornado, and conveyed to Cuba......Oct. 31, 1873 Above ninety insurgents and sailors tried; many insurgents and six British and thirty Americans shot......Nov. 4-7, 1873 William M. Tweed convicted......Nov. 19, 1873 Forty-third Congress, first session, opens......Dec. 1, 1873 Vote for speaker of the House: James G. Blaine, 189; Fernando Wood, 76; S. S. Cox, 2; Hiester Clymer, 1; Alexander H. Stephens, 1......Dec. 1, 1873 Prof. Louis J. R. Agassiz, scientist, born 1807, dies at Cambridge, Mass.......Dec. 14, 1873 Virginius surrendered to the United States by Spain; she founders at sea off Cape Fear while on her way to New York......Dec. 19, 1873 Ex-Mayor Hall, of New York, acquitted......Dec. 24, 1873 Survivors of the Virginius massacre, 102, surrendered to the United States authorities at Santiago de Cuba, Dec. 18, reach New York