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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for A. Cox or search for A. Cox in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
, not many miles distant—we arrived at this place the next day. After remaining here two days, about twelve o'clock at night, the long roll sounded, and we were ordered to strike tents at once, and prepare to fall back, as it was reported that General Cox, with a large force, was rapidly advancing upon us; we lost no time in executing these orders, and were soon on the march. Floyd's command fell back to Meadow Bluff, which consumed several days. Here we encamped for about two weeks. General Major Strange, of Forrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morton, of Nashville, late Chief of Artillery of Forrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer, of Murfreesboro. 8. Prison Experience at Johnson's Island—By Captain Beard.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Floyd's operations in West Virginia in 1861. (search)
heir way to reinforce General Floyd's command. So quietly and expeditiously was this retreat conducted that General Wise's command did not seem to know anything about it until that morning. Both commands now took up a line of march for Dogwood Gap, not many miles distant—we arrived at this place the next day. After remaining here two days, about twelve o'clock at night, the long roll sounded, and we were ordered to strike tents at once, and prepare to fall back, as it was reported that General Cox, with a large force, was rapidly advancing upon us; we lost no time in executing these orders, and were soon on the march. Floyd's command fell back to Meadow Bluff, which consumed several days. Here we encamped for about two weeks. General Wise's brigade fell back to Little Sewel Mountain—the General fortified his position, and said that he would remain there until that hot place froze over. In a short while General Rosencrans, with his command of Federal troops came up and took their
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
eady the promise of the following papers: I. The Battle of Franklin. Discussed in papers by Generals B. F. Cheatham, G. W. Gordon, W. B. Bate, and E. Capers. 2. Biographical sketch of General Bedford Forrest—By Rev. Dr. Kelly. 3. Sketch of Major Strange, of Forrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morton, of Nashville, late Chief of Artillery of Forrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer, of Murfreesboro. 8. Prison Experience at Johnson's Island—By Captain Beard. 9. Memoir of General Pat Cleburne—By General John C. Brown. Other papers and addresses will be announced. The meeting will be held during the week of the great competitive drill, and at such hours as not to conflict with that; the railroads
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 54 (search)
ton who led the second charge, was severely wounded. Ashton is missing in our company; Rust (mortally); Carroll and Palmer were wounded, the two latter very slightly. Poor Eddie——did not go into the fight, but lost his horse subsequently, wandered off, and was, I fear, captured. Since I parted with him that evening, looking for his horse, I have not heard from him. I think it likely he went to our hospital in the neighborhood, and being without a horse, remained to attend to our wounded. A. Cox was left for that purpose. That night we traveled about ten miles, and spent the night in quietude. Next day we were ready for, and in anticipation of, a fight, but had none. Commenced in the evening a march after the Yankee cavalry, who were said to be after our wagon trains. Marched all night, all next day, and had a fight at a pass in the mountains below Emmettsburg. Were in the saddle all next night, reached Lightesburg where we learned we were close upon the enemy, who had that d