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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 87 1 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 62 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 57 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 52 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 39 13 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 26 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 21 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Jacob D. Cox or search for Jacob D. Cox in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan organizing the grand Army. (search)
anization that two French aides-de-camp were assigned to duty as military attaches on McClellan's staff. His brilliant operations in Western Virginia against Lee,--who had not yet revealed the full extent of his military genius, and whom McClellan was destined to find again in his front but a year later,--the successes of Laurel Hill and Rich Mountain, gave evidence of what might be expected of the inexperienced troops placed in McClellan's hands. See McClellan in West Virginia, by General J. D. Cox, Vol. I., p. 126.--Editors. He had already shown rare strategic ability, and the President had confided to him the task of creating the Army of the Potomac from the disorganized bands who had fallen back on Washington under the brave and unfortunate McDowell. Surrounded for the most part by young officers, he was himself the most youthful of us all, not only by reason of his physical vigor, the vivacity of his impressions, the noble candor of his character, and his glowing patriotism
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.33 (search)
West Virginia operations under Fremont. a continuation of McClellan in West Virginia. see Vol. I., p. 126.--Editors. by Jacob D. Cox, Major-General, U. S. V. The campaign of the spring of 1862 was an interesting one in its details, but as it became subordinate to that against Jackson in the Shenandoah and was never completed as Fremont had planned, a very brief sketch of it must suffice. On the 29th of March Fremont assumed command of the Mountain Department, including West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and East Tennessee as far as Knoxville. There was a little too much sentiment and too little practical war in the construction of a department out of five hundred miles of mountain ranges, and the appointment of the path-finder to command it was consistent with the romantic character of the whole. The mountains formed an admirable barrier at which comparatively small bodies of troops could cover and protect the Ohio Valley behind them, but extensive military operations across
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
0 men, sent from Washington and other points north of the Potomac, before the end of May, Jackson had about 80,000 men to take into account (including all Union forces north of the Rappahannock and east of the Ohio) and to keep from a junction with McClellan in front of Richmond. Not less than 65,000 This seems to us an overestimate of the Union forces actually in the Valley during the operations of May and June. April 30th, Banks had 9178 present for duty ; May 31st, Fremont had 14,672 (Cox and Kelley not in the Valley); McDowell's force that reached the Valley (including Shield's division, which on May 31st numbered 10,203), aggregated about 21,000. To tal, 44,840. Saxton had about 7000 at Harper's Ferry, which were not engaged.--Editors. of these enemies were in the Valley under their various commanders in May and June [see p. 299]. Besides Ewell's division already mentioned, General Johnston could give no further assistance to Jackson, for McClellan was right in his fron
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
hat all of the reenforcements and movements of the troops promised me had altogether failed. The first information appears to have been received in a communication between the telegraph operators at Pope's headquarters and at Manassas Junction, dated 8:20 P. M., on August 26th. From this time until the 30th all direct communication between General Pope and Washington remained cut off, and nothing was heard of him except via Falmouth.--Editors. Had Franklin been even at Centreville, or had Cox's and Sturgis's divisions been as far west as Bull Run on that day, the movement of Jackson on Manassas Junction would not have been practicable. As Jackson's movement on Manassas Junction marks the beginning of the second battle of Bull Run, it is essential to a clear understanding of subsequent operations to give the positions of the army under my command on the night of August 26th, as also the movements and operations of the enemy as far as we knew them. From the 18th until the nigh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
Pending our movements south-west of the Rappahannock, General Stuart had been making an effort to go around Pope's army, but, fearing to remain on the Washington side of the river in the face of such floods as had come, recrossed with some important dispatches he had captured by a charge upon Pope's headquarters train [see p. 528]. This correspondence confirmed the information we already had, that the Federal army on the James under McClellan and the Federal troops in the Kanawha Valley under Cox had been ordered to reinforce Pope [see p. 278]. Upon receipt of that information, General Lee was more anxious than ever to cross at once. Pope, however, was on the alert, and Lee found he could not attack him to advantage in his stronghold behind the Rappahannock. Lee therefore decided to change his whole plan, and was gratified, on looking at the map, to find a very comfortable way of turning Pope out of his position. It was by moving Jackson off to our left, and far to the rear of the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
rals, but believing that they had retired. General Cox's Federal division was at that very time maorps (Reno's) consisted of four divisions under Cox, Willcox, Sturgis, and Rodman; or eight brigademin, Clark, and Muhlenberg. According to General Cox, until the arrival of Willcox with his division, about 2 o'clock, Cox's division and a portion of Pleasonton's cavalry were the only Union trorived on the field about 3:30.--Editors General Cox, who fought Garland, had six Ohio regimentsmost likely equally strong, and I conclude that Cox's infantry, artillery, and cavalry reached threich he held until 10 o'clock that night. General Cox, having beaten the force in his front, now and fell back to their former positions. General Cox seems not to have suspected that the defeatand, but failed and met a serious repulse. General Cox says of this attack: The enemy made severalhe map. (4) About 2 o'clock, on the Union side, Cox's division was reenforced by the arriving divis[10 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Forcing Fox's Gap and Turner's Gap. (search)
Forcing Fox's Gap and Turner's Gap. by Jacob D. Cox, Major-General, U. S. V. Confederate dead at the cross-roads by Wise's House at Fox's Gap [see pp. 668 and 573]. from a sketch made the day after the battle.On the 5th of September, 1862, the Kanawha Division was ordered by McClellan to report to General Burnside, commanding the Right Wing of the Army of the Potomac. For an account of the transfer of the Kanawha Division from West Virginia to the Potomac, see p. 2 81. The division was not engaged in the second battle of Bull. Run; but two regiments of Scammon's brigade were under fire at Bull Run Bridge, near Union Mills, August 27th.--Editors. We left Upton's Hill early on the morning of the 6th, crossed the river, and marched through Washington to Leesboro, Maryland, where the First Corps Confusion in the numbers of the First and Twelfth Corps is found in the records and correspondence. In the Army of Virginia, Sigel's corps (Eleventh) had been designated as First, B
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
Cowan; F, 5th U. S., Lieut. Leonard Martin. Ninth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside (commanded the right wing of the army at South Mountain and exercised general command on the left at Antietam), Maj.-Gen. Jesse L. Reno (k), Brig. Gen. Jacob D. Cox. Staff loss: South Mountain, k, 1. Escort: G, 1st Me. Cav., Capt. Zebulon B. Blethen. first division, Brig.-Gen. Orlando B. Willcox. First Brigade, Col. Benjamin C. Christ: 28th Mass., Capt. Andrew P. Caraher; 17th Mich., Col. Wincis Beach; 4th R. i., Col. William H. P. Steere (w), Lieut.-Col. Joseph B. Curtis. Brigade loss: Antietam, k, 133: w, 462; m, 23 == 618. Artillery: A, 5th U. S., Lieut. Charles P. Muhlenberg. Loss: Antietam, w, 3. Kanawha division, Brig.-Gen. Jacob D. Cox, Col. Eliakim P. Scammon. First Brigade, Col. Eliakim P. Scammon, Col. Hugh Ewing: 12th Ohio, Col. Carr B. White; 23d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Rutherford B. Hayes (w), Maj. James M. Comly; 30th Ohio, Col. Hugh Ewing, Lieut.-Col. Theodore Jones
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in Maryland. (search)
ped of his troops,--sent to the help of Jackson,--held the right almost alone, with his eye on the center. He was now called into active work on his own front, for there were no unfought troops in Lee's army at Sharpsburg; every soldier on that field tasted battle. General Burnside, with his corps of fourteen thousand men, had been lying all day beyond the bridge which now bears his name. Ordered to cross at 8 o'clock he managed to get over at 1, and by 3 was ready to advance. See General Cox's statements, p. 647.--Editors. He moved against the hill which D. R. Jones held with his little division of 2500 men. Longstreet was watching this advance. Jackson was at General Lee's headquarters on a knoll in rear of Sharpsburg. A. P. Hill was coming, but had not arrived, and it was apparent that Burnside must be stayed, if at all, with artillery. One of the sections, transferred to the right from Jackson at the request of General Lee, was of the Rockbridge Artillery, and as it gal
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
The battle of Antietam. by Jacob D. Cox, Major-General, U. S. V. North of the Dunker Church--a Union charge through the corn-field.It was not till some time past noon of the 15th of September that, the way being clear for the Ninth Corps at South Mountain, we marched through Fox's gap to the Boonsboro' and Sharpsburg turnpike, and along this road till we came up in rear of Sumner's command. Hooker's corps, which was part of the right wing (Burnside's), had been in the advance, and had moved off from the turnpike to the right near Keedysville. I was with the Kanawha Division, assuming that my temporary command of the corps ended with the battle on the mountain. When we approached the line of hills bordering the Antietam, we received orders to turn off the road to the left, and halted our battalions closed in mass. It was now about 3 o'clock in the afternoon. McClellan, as it seemed, had just reached the field, and was surrounded by a group of his principal officers, most of