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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for R. S. Cox or search for R. S. Cox in all documents.

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te Stewart or G. W. Smith from leaving my front. We did that. I was also to be carefully prepared to reenforce Logan should he require any assistance. My Fourth Corps men were ready for that also. As the battle came nearer, being naturally anxious, and desirous to be very prompt when Sherman should say the word, I took a few officers with me, and went over some hundred yards to Schofield's front. He had before this sent out one brigade to Decatur to help Sprague defend the trains, and Cox with two others over to be near to Dodge. Schofield and Sherman, with a few officers and orderlies, were mounted when I arrived, and standing near the Howard House then on the prolongation of Logan's line of battle. The fearful break of Logan's right front had been made. Our troops seemed to have swung around so as to be at right angles with their proper line of battle. Captain DeGress, who had just lost his Parrott guns, was on the ground, near Sherman's stirrup. He was apparently muc
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 45: March through the Carolinas; the Battle of Bentonville; Johnston's surrender (search)
lines were rather irregular and broken, but so established as to make a thorough defense of the village and of the Confederate line of retreat. I hardly think that Johnston could have done better, even if he had followed up more quickly Carlin's retiring men. There was so much more woodland than open ground in the vicinity of Bentonville and so much marshy or spongy soil that quick maneuvering was impossible. Leading my force, I approached Bentonville, threw a brigade and battery toward Cox's bridge to save it, and kept back any enemy coming from that quarter. The bridge was burned upon our approach. We had similar experience to Slocum with detachments of the Confederate cavalry becoming more and more stubborn as we advanced. A little nearer the village we struck a crossroad where there was a Confederate outpost held by infantry in the edge of a wood. This caused the deployment of a part of Woods's division, which was on the lead. The point was soon cleared, though a stro
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 50: courts for freedmen; medical care and provision for orphans (search)
and resources mainly to orphan children. They cared for between one and two hundred during 1865. At first the association occupied the abandoned property of Mr. R. S. Cox, situated near Georgetown in the District, and they greatly hoped to retain that property, which was in a healthful location and in every way commodious. But,I informed the ladies of the association that President Johnson had requested the Bureau to provide some other place for the orphans because he had fully pardoned Mr. Cox, the Confederate owner, and he was thereby entitled to complete restoration of his estate. The ladies were much grieved at this action of the President, yet afteu erected a suitable building for the asylum. Here the orphans were properly provided for. It further aided the good ladies with rations and medical attendance. Mr. Cox, a citizen newly made by the removal of his political disabilities, sought a little retributive justice against that association of ladies by suing them for damag
y, George B., I, 70. Coster, Charles R., I, 417. Couch, D. N., I, 172, 220, 229, 230, 233-239, 272, 289, 298, 306, 311, 324, 337, 344, 345, 349, 356, 359, 362, 367, 398; II, 181. Courcillon, de, Eugene, 1, 65. Courtney, Mr., I, 238. Cox, Jacob 1)., 1, 272, 280, 303, 304, 511, 565, 585, 592, 609; 11, 13. Cox, R. S., II, 260, 261. Cox, Samuel S., II, 200. Craig, Henry K., I, 66, 67. Craighill, William P., I, 281. Cravath, E. M., 11, 407. Crawford, Samuel W., I, 295.Cox, R. S., II, 260, 261. Cox, Samuel S., II, 200. Craig, Henry K., I, 66, 67. Craighill, William P., I, 281. Cravath, E. M., 11, 407. Crawford, Samuel W., I, 295. Crook, George, 1, 302-305. Cross, Edward A., I, 185, 243, 247, 301, 342. Cruft, Charles, I, 476. Cudlipp, William, II, 465-467. Curtin, A. G., I, 138. Curtis, N. M., II, 347. Custer, George A., II, 475. Cutler, Lysander, I, 407, 415. Cuyler, John M., I, 181, 253. Dahlgren, John A., II, 85,91,92,96. Daily, Dennis, I, 497. Dallas, Battle of, I, 550-570. Dalton, Battle of, I, 499-512. Dana, N. J. T., I, 239, 292, 296, 297. Danby, Miss, II, 99. Daniels,