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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William H. Crank or search for William H. Crank in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ern Virginia, and of Hood's old brigade, met us at the depot and escorted us to the Capitol hotel, one of the finest and most elegantly furnished in the South, where Captain Scurry had his fine company, the Light Guard, drawn up to receive the General, who passed, with his escort, through their open ranks, with uncovered head, and entered the spacious parlors where a large crowd of ladies and gentlemen were assembled to receive and greet him. In behalf of the good people of Houston, Major Wm. H. Crank made the following appropriate address of welcome, which was received with loud applause: Ladies and Gentlemen,—We are here to tender the welcome, which Texans know so well how to offer, to one who bears a name honored and revered throughout the civilized world. The name of Robt. E. Lee is held in reverence throughout christendom as the synonym of all that is good, pure and great. Like his great prototype, he who now stands before you has shown himself not only renowned in war, bu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ern Virginia, and of Hood's old brigade, met us at the depot and escorted us to the Capitol hotel, one of the finest and most elegantly furnished in the South, where Captain Scurry had his fine company, the Light Guard, drawn up to receive the General, who passed, with his escort, through their open ranks, with uncovered head, and entered the spacious parlors where a large crowd of ladies and gentlemen were assembled to receive and greet him. In behalf of the good people of Houston, Major Wm. H. Crank made the following appropriate address of welcome, which was received with loud applause: Ladies and Gentlemen,—We are here to tender the welcome, which Texans know so well how to offer, to one who bears a name honored and revered throughout the civilized world. The name of Robt. E. Lee is held in reverence throughout christendom as the synonym of all that is good, pure and great. Like his great prototype, he who now stands before you has shown himself not only renowned in war, bu