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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 41 5 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 41 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Thomas T. Craven or search for Thomas T. Craven in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
ommand of Lieutenant Francis Winslow, she had not retreated with the other vessels, but .had come down to beg Captain Pope to return. After this inglorious affair no further attempt was made to hold the Head of the Passes. A Federal vessel was then stationed off the mouth of each pass. Deck of the U. S. S. Richmond after she passed the forts the men at quarters commander James Alden on the bridge Commander James Alden Captain Henry W. Morris; Brooklyn, twenty-four guns, Captain Thomas T. Craven; Richmond, twenty-two guns, Commander James Alden. Side-wheel steamer: Mississippi, seven guns, Commander Melancton Smith. Screw corvettes: Oneida, nine guns, Commander Samuel Phillips Lee; Varuna, ten guns, Commander Charles S. Boggs; Iroquois, seven guns, Commander John De Camp. Screw gunboats: Cayuga, two guns, Lieutenant Napoleon B. Harrison; Itasca, four guns, Lieutenant C. H. B. Caldwell; Katahdin, two guns, Lieutenant George H. Preble; Kennebec, two guns, Lieutenant
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
o, in both its forms, offensive and defensive, and the third was the submergible and actually the submarine, the diving ship of to-day. The purposes and methods of their employment have not been changed; only in the details of construction and in the perfection of machinery and mechanism can the difference be seen. The first notice of the torpedo in Civil War annals is when two were found floating down the Potomac on July 7, 1861. They were made of boiler-iron and were intended for Commander Craven's little flotilla that was protecting Washington. Out in the West, when Foote and his gunboats made their way up the Tennessee they actually steamed past, without touching, some mines that had drifted out of the channel. The gunboat Cairo was the first victim of this new style of warfare, in the Yazoo River, December 12, 1862. With the exception of the actions along the Potomac and in The beginnings of submarine warfare: a Confederate photograph of 1864--the first David, figurin
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
und her and attempted to blockade her. On March 24th the Stonewall steamed out of Ferrol and cleared for action. Commander T. T. Craven, of the Niagara, had already notified his Government that in a smooth sea the Stonweall would be a match for threets and could be brought quickly to bear over a wide range. The Stonewall, a dread Confederate destroyer Commodore Thomas T. Craven trips from Bermuda to Wilmington, and was then fitted out as a commerce-destroyer, being renamed the Tallahassnewall. Stopping at Coruña, Spain, she was threatened by the United States warships Niagara and Sacramento. But Commodore Thomas T. Craven of the Niagara decided that the Stonewall in a fight ought to be more than a match for three such ships as the rate ram Stonewall Havana the war was over. The Cuban authorities took over the vessel and paid off the crew. Commodore Craven was declared guilty by court martial for his lack of effort to destroy the Stonewall, but Secretary Welles, finding