hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 48 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 54 results in 4 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
y carried two torpedoes, each containing one hundred pounds of powder, with their appendages, which were transported on stretchers across the swamps. John W. Lloyd, coxswain, and Charles Baldwin, coalheaver, swam the river with a line and hauled the torpedoes across to the Plymouth shore close to the town. The torpedoes were then connected by a bridle floated down with the current, guided by Charles Baldwin, who designed to place them across the Albemarle's bow, one on either side, and Allen Crawford, fireman, who was stationed in the swamps on the opposite side of the river, was to explode them on a given signal. Everything worked well until the torpedoes were within a few yards of the ram, when Baldwin was seen and hailed by a sentry on the wharf. The sentry then fired two shots, which was soon followed by a volley of musketry, which induced Lloyd to cut the guiding line, throw away the coil, and swim the river again to join John Laverty, fireman, who was left in charge of the
hauled the torpedoes over to the Plymouth shore, above the town. They were then connected by a bridle, floated down with the current, and guided by Charles Baldwin, who designed to place them across the bow of the ram--one on either side-and Allen Crawford, fireman, who was stationed on the opposite side of the river, in the swamp, was to explode them on a given signal. Everything had worked favorably from the time of starting, until the torpedoes were within a few yards of the ram, when Bal coal-heaver, returned to the ship the morning of the twenty-seventh, after an absence of thirty-eight hours in the swamps, encountering the additional discomfort of a rainy day and night. Two days unsuccessful search was made for Baldwin and Crawford, both of whom made their appearance on Sunday, the twenty-ninth instant, much fatigued by travel, and somewhat exhausted from the loss of food. No traces of their intended designs were left behind them. I cannot too highly commend this party f
they were to form; and in the letters of Generals Crawford, Griffin, and Ayres, who commanded my thtions. He saw nothing of the fighting of General Crawford's division, which suffered more from the utler's; General Ayres' near S. Dabney's; General Crawford's about half-way between. They are alongoved up to the point where Generals Ayres and Crawford were. The action of the enemy, however inter up in heavy force, compelling both Ayres and Crawford to fall back on Griffin, and, of course, in mps, are left behind. General Ayres and General Crawford will have their troops under arms at daybh of Gravelly Run, and in the order of Ayres, Crawford, Griffin, with General Bartlett's brigade neaime, that I did not learn the position of General Crawford and General Griffin till one A. M., and sas just mounting to join Generals Griffin and Crawford, to move across the country against the enemyas found be developed. I remained with General Crawford's division, which we formed to retire in [12 more...]
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
f these attempts was planned and carried out by enlisted men, and deserves to be noticed, if only as showing the pluck and devotion of the seamen of the navy during the war. The men who took part in the expedition were John W. Loyd, coxswain, Allen Crawford and John Laverty, firemen, and Charles Baldwin and Benjamin Loyd, coalheavers. All were volunteers from the Wyalusing. On the afternoon of the 25th of May, the party ascended the Middle River, a small branch of the Roanoke, in a boat, takin the liver with a line, and hauled the torpedoes to the Plymouth side, above the town. They were then connected by a bridle, and floated down the river, guided by Baldwin. It was his intention to place them across the bow of the Albemarle, and Crawford, from the swamps on the opposite side, was to explode them at a signal. All went well until the torpedoes were within a few yards of the ram, when the line fouled a schooner. At the same moment, Baldwin was discovered by a sentry, and shots we