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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for G. W. Crawford or search for G. W. Crawford in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
tion of the negotiations. The only document which has thus far come to light and in which any reference to the proposed Confederacy is made is the report of Mr. Ambrose R. Wright, dated at Savannah, Ga., March 13, 1861, and addressed to Hon. G. W. Crawford, President of the Georgia Convention, by which Mr. Wright had been authorized to visit Maryland and to induce this State, if possible, to join the Confederacy of the cotton-growing States of the South. Mr. Wright visited Maryland, and at ltaneously with the blow from the South, would have crushed it, and, instead of one Union, inseparable forever, the map of the United States would to-day show at least three, if not more, combinations of States. Mr. Wright, in his report to Mr. Crawford, President of the Georgia convention, says: On the 25th of February (1861), I visited for the third time Annapolis, the seat of government (having failed, while there on a former visit on the 21st, to meet the Executive), and waited upon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Thomas R. R. Cobb. (search)
gia for Howell, and South Carolina divided between Howell and Davis, with Memminger and Withers wavering. Howell immediately announced his wish that Davis should be unanimously elected. When the Georgia delegation met, Mr. Stephens moved to give Mr. Toombs a complimentary vote from Georgia. I suggested that four States were for Davis, and it would place Mr. Toombs in a false position. Toombs expressed his doubt that four States were for Davis, and preferred they should be canvassed. Judge Crawford was commissioned to do so. Then came the question as to Vice-President. Mr. Toombs returned the compliment by suggesting Mr. Stephens. Kenan and Nisbet responded in favor of it, but a death-like stillness reigned as to the balance. We saw they had us, so after a few minutes Howell retired. Bartow followed him and I followed Bartow. I was told that no other word was spoken after we retired. When we reached the capitol, we heard that Georgia had presented Mr. Stephens. We placed ours