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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 141 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for L. W. Crawford or search for L. W. Crawford in all documents.

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y's fortifications. Thousands of heads appeared above the top of our parallel, and every one manifested the deepest interest in the scenes which were transpiring. It was only by a stern command that the General kept the men from rushing headlong, heedless of all lurking danger, into the intrenchments. Very soon the detachments reached the ditch in front, and began to mount the parapets. General Jameson and Colonel Black mounted first. They were closely followed by Colonel Gove, Lieutenant Crawford and Captain Hassler, of the General's staff. The General jumped inside the work, which was seen to be deserted, and presently it was swarming with our soldiers. The glorious emblem of our nationality was raised above the deserted battlements, and, as its folds were kissed by the gentle breeze, the General uncovered his head and called for three cheers for the good old Stars and Stripes. A feeling of profound veneration arose in the hearts of all as we beheld the grand old flag wavi
of the fact. The report of the Medical Director, Surgeon W. S. King, exhibits the disposition of nearly one thousand sick and disabled men left at Strasburgh, of Shields' division, upon its removal to the Rappahannock Valley. My warmest thanks are due to the officers and men of my command, for their unflinching courage and unyielding spirit exhibited on the march and its attendant combats, especially to Brig.-Gen. A. S. Williams, commanding the division; Gen. George S. Greene and Gen. L. W. Crawford, who had reported for duty, but were yet unassigned to separate commands. They accompanied the column throughout the march, and rendered me most valuable assistance. My thanks are also due to the gentlemen of my staff--Major D. D. Perkins, Chief of Staff; Capt. James W. Abert, of the Topographical Engineers; Capt. William Sheff<*>er, Capt. Frederick Munthur, and Capt. Frederick De Hautenville, for their arduous labors. It gives me pleasure, also, to commend the conduct of Col.
overnment. Generals Williams, Augur, Gorman, Crawford, Prince, Green, and Geary, behaved with conspe timber, had been ordered by you to join General Crawford's command, which after engaging the enemylt proved the correctness of their judgment. Crawford proceeded rapidly to the front, and occupied f Bayard's cavalry. Shortly after ordering Crawford, General Pope also ordered the rest of Banks'd Williams's divisions of infantry, including Crawford's and Gordon's brigades, made three most desp Gen. Prince stood next, then Generals Geary, Crawford, and Gordon. Just after Gen. Green had taken ed Slaughter Mountain. The brigade of Generals Crawford and Gordon, occupying the extreme right,f the brigades of Generals Prince, Geary, and Crawford. The number of men actually in the fight wasd to join the brigade of that corps, under Gen. Crawford, which had been pushed forward on the day g their advantage, came round on that flank. Crawford was obliged to give way on the right, and his[23 more...]
ake up his position on the ground occupied by Crawford's brigade of his command, which had been throovernment. Generals Williams, Augur, Gorman, Crawford, Prince, Green, and Geary, behaved with consp move at once with my brigade and support General Crawford, who was engaging the enemy's left. I mod. In half an hour after receiving this order Crawford was on the march. As his brigade, the Twentylt proved the correctness of their judgment. Crawford proceeded rapidly to the front, and occupied ht. That point was immediately in the rear of Crawford. Major-Gen. Sigel was also at the same time P. M., had progressed to within long range of Crawford's artillery. At four P. M. the enemy develop small battery opening upon the brigade of Gen. Crawford, which has been in that vicinity for sever Gen. Prince stood next, then Generals Geary, Crawford, and Gordon. Just after Gen. Green had taken ed Slaughter Mountain. The brigade of Generals Crawford and Gordon, occupying the extreme right,[10 more...]
t-House on the morning of the eighth of August. The town had been occupied for several days by Crawford's brigade, of Gen. Banks's corps; and on the seventh Ricketts's division, of McDowell's corps, n body of the enemy and the lower fords of the Rappahannock. Early in the day I pushed forward Crawford's brigade, of Banks's corps, in the direction of Cedar or Slaughter Mountain, to support Gen. Bard toward Cedar Mountain with his whole corps, and to join the brigade of that corps, under Gen. Crawford, which had been pushed forward on the day previous. I directed Gen. Banks to take up a stro this tribute to the memory of one and to the rising fame of the other. Gens. Williams, Augur, Crawford, Green, Geary, Carroll, and Prince, of Banks's corps, have been already noticed for their gallase on this side, and the whole force will unite between Warrenton and Waterloo Bridge. Call in Crawford at once, and leave nothing behind you. Follow Sigel very closely, and keep constant communicati
ictorious, Gen. Hooker determined to advance. Orders were sent to Crawford and Gordon — the two Mansfield brigades — to move forward at once,k about him. There is a regiment to the right. Order it forward! Crawford and Gordon are coming up. Tell them to carry those woods and hold s command was broken, but with his right still untouched, and with Crawford's and Gordon's brigades just up; above all, with the advance of th Sumner arrived just as Hooker was leaving, and assumed command. Crawford and Gordon had gone into the woods, and were holding them stoutly f his column, advancing rapidly through the timber, opposite where Crawford was fighting. The veteran General was riding alone in the forest,. Sedgwick's division was in advance, moving forward to support Crawford and Gordon. Rebel reinforcements were approaching also, and the s the enemy, perceiving their advantage, came round on that flank. Crawford was obliged to give way on the right, and his troops pouring in co
Lawton's and Wright's wounds, though severe, are not considered dangerous. The same may be said of Colonel Gordon's and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot's of Sixth Alabama; Major-General Anderson's, Brigadier-General Anderson's, and Brigadier-General Ripley's. I have omitted to mention, in the proper place, that Major Robert S. Smith and Lieutenant Lewis Cobb, of the Fourth Georgia, were killed; also, Lieutenants Underwood and Cleveland, of the Eighteenth Georgia. Captains George Maddox and Crawford, Lieutenants Callahan and Williams, and Sergeant McMurray, (the latter mortally,) of the same regiment, were wounded. Private Slade, of the Second Georgia, killed. This list imperfect, perhaps, limited as it is, and comprises only such names as I have been able to gather up during the progress of the fight. My arrangements have all been made to procure full, as far as possible, correct lists of the killed and wounded, provided the army should not move immediately. But I cannot say m
use, Va. General Pope's despatch. headquarters of the army of Virginia, August 3, 1862--A. M. Major-General Halleck: the reconnoitring columns under Gen. Crawford crossed the Rapidan and pushed forward to Orange Court-House, yesterday, and took possession of the town, which was occupied by two regiments of the enemy's cather regiments were on the move, their long line filing away towards the fords of the Rapidan. A single glance at headquarters showed that the body-guard of Gen. Crawford were standing in silence, waiting for the movement of the chief, and it soon became known that the expedition, whatever its destination, was to be guided and d us into the town, and closing up, we prepared to enter Orange. Steadily we moved onward until our advance passed into the town, followed by the main body. Gen. Crawford, with an admirable foresight, had ordered a strong flanking party to go around to our left towards the Gordonsville road, and a fine squadron of the Fifth New-