hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 13 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 18 results in 7 document sections:

Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Treaty of peace-mexican Bull fights-regimental quartermaster-trip to Popocatepetl-trip to the caves of Mexico (search)
of 1848 a party of officers obtained leave to visit Popocatapetl [Popocatepetl], the highest volcano in America, and to take an escort. I went with the party, many of whom afterwards occupied conspicuous positions before the country. Of those who went south, and attained high rank, there was Lieutenant Richard Anderson, who commanded a corps at Spottsylvania; Captain [H. H.] Sibley, a major-general, and, after the war, for a number of years in the employ of the Khedive of Egypt; Captain George Crittenden, a rebel general; S. B. Buckner, who surrendered Fort Donelson; and Mansfield Lovell, who commanded at New Orleans before that city fell into the hands of the National troops. Of those who remained on our side there were Captain Andrew Porter, Lieutenant C. P. Stone and Lieutenant Z. B. Tower. There were quite a number of other officers, whose names I cannot recollect. At a little village (Ozumba) near the base of Popocatapetl, where we purposed to commence the ascent, we pro
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The Army at Pittsburg landing-injured by a fall --the Confederate attack at Shiloh-the first day's fight at Shiloh-General Sherman-condition of the Army-close of the first day's fight --the second day's fight-retreat and defeat of the Confederates (search)
edit them with doing all there was for them to do. During the night of the 6th the remainder of Nelson's division, Buell's army, crossed the river and were ready to advance in the morning, forming the left wing. Two other divisions, [Thomas L.] Crittenden's and [Alexander McD.] McCook's, came up the river from Savannah in the transports and were on the west bank early on the 7th. Buell commanded them in person. My command was thus nearly doubled in numbers and efficiency. During the night ht. The position of the Union troops on the morning of the 7th was as follows: General Lew. Wallace on the right; Sherman on his left; then McClernand and then Hurlbut. Nelson, of Buell's army, was on our extreme left, next to the river. Crittenden was next in line after Nelson and on his right; McCook followed and formed the extreme right of Buel's command. My old command thus formed the right wing, while the troops directly under Buell constituted the left wing of the army. These rela
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, First meeting with Secretary Stanton-General Rosecrans-Commanding military division of Mississippi-Andrew Johnson's Address-arrival at Chattanooga (search)
began to join him. Then Bragg took the initiative. Rosecrans had to fall back in turn, and was able to get his army together at Chickamauga, some miles south-east of Chattanooga, before the main battle was brought on. The battle was fought on the 19th and 20th of September, and Rosecrans was badly defeated, with a heavy loss in artillery and some sixteen thousand men killed, wounded and captured. The corps under Major-General George H. Thomas stood its ground, while Rosecrans, with Crittenden and McCook, returned to Chattanooga. Thomas returned also, but later, and with his troops in good order. Bragg followed and took possession of Missionary Ridge, overlooking Chattanooga. He also occupied Lookout Mountain, west of the town, which Rosecrans had abandoned, and with it his control of the river and the river road as far back as Bridgeport. The National troops were now strongly intrenched in Chattanooga Valley, with the Tennessee River behind them and the enemy occupying comm
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Operations in Mississippi-Longstreet in east Tennessee-commissioned Lieutenant-General-Commanding the armies of the United States-first interview with President Lincoln (search)
time from my new command than was necessary. The first point which I wished to discuss was particularly about the co-operation of his command with mine when the spring campaign should commence. There were also other and minor points, minor as compared with the great importance of the question to be decided by sanguinary war — the restoration to duty of officers who had been relieved from important commands, namely McClellan, Burnside and Fremont in the East, and Buell, McCook, Negley and Crittenden in the West. Some time in the winter of 1863-64 I had been invited by the general-in-chief to give my views of the campaign I thought advisable for the command under me-now Sherman's. General J. E. Johnston was defending Atlanta and the interior of Georgia with an army, the largest part of which was stationed at Dalton, about 38 miles south of Chattanooga. Dalton is at the junction of the railroad from Cleveland with the one from Chattanooga to Atlanta. There could have been no d
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Movement by the left flank-battle of North Anna-an incident of the March-moving on Richmond-South of the Pamunkey-position of the National Army (search)
by the south side of the river. They found the enemy too strong to justify a serious attack. A third ford was found between Ox Ford and Jericho. Burnside was directed to cross a division over this ford, and to send one division to Hancock. Crittenden was crossed by this newly-discovered ford, and formed up the river to connect with Crawford's left. Potter joined Hancock by way of the wooden bridge. Crittenden had a severe engagement with some of Hill's corps on his crossing the river, andCrittenden had a severe engagement with some of Hill's corps on his crossing the river, and lost heavily. When joined to Warren's corps he was no further molested. Burnside still guarded Ox Ford from the north side. Lee now had his entire army south of the North Anna. Our lines covered his front, with the six miles separating the two wings guarded by but a single division. To get from one wing to the other the river would have to be crossed twice. Lee could reinforce any part of his line from all points of it in a very short march; or could concentrate the whole of it whereve
Officers returning home. --The New Orleans Delta, of the 18th inst., says: Col. George Crittenden, late of the United States Army, and one of its most gallant and accomplished officers, arrived in the city yesterday from New Mexico, via Texas. Col. Crittenden resigned from the old concern before leaving New Mexico, despite the tenacity with which his father clung to the Union--From Col. C. we learn that Major Loring was only waiting to be relieved in New Mexico to return to the Sout Mexico, via Texas. Col. Crittenden resigned from the old concern before leaving New Mexico, despite the tenacity with which his father clung to the Union--From Col. C. we learn that Major Loring was only waiting to be relieved in New Mexico to return to the South, and that some five or six other officers who had resigned were also on their way home. Gen. A. S. Johnson, it is supposed, is with Colonel Jack Hays' party, which started from California some time ago, in the direction of Texas.
scertained, through the courtesy of Mr. D. G. Duncan, the following additional particulars of this affair: Col. A. P. Hill, commanding the Brigade, whose headquarters are at Camp Davis, Romney, ordered, on the night of the 18th. Col. J. C. Vaughan, of the third Tennessee Reg't, to proceed to the line of the enemy at New Creek Depot, eighteen miles West of Cumberland, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, with two companies of the 13th Regiment of Virginia Volunteers, commanded by Captains Crittenden and White, and two companies, of the 3rd Tennessee Regiment, commanded by Captains Dillard and Mathis, to disperse the Federal forces there collected. The march of 38 miles was made between 8 P. M. and 12 M. next day. The enemy was found, posted in some strength, with two pieces of artillery, but had no pickets out. At 5 o'clock A. M., on the morning of 19th, after reconnoitering, the order to charge was given by Col. Vaughn, and was gallantly executed in good order, but with gre