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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Crittenden, George Bibb 1812-1880 (search)
Crittenden, George Bibb 1812-1880 Military officer; born in Russellville, Ky., March 20, 1812; graduated at West Point in 1832. He resigned the next year, served in the war against Mexico (1846-48) under General Scott, joined the Confederates, and became a major-general and, with Zollicoffer, was defeated in the battle at Mill Spring, in January, 1862. He was a son of John J. Crittenden. He died in Danville, Ky., Nov. 27, 1880.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kentucky, (search)
,000 men down the railroad, and pushed the Confederate line to Bowling Green, after a sharp skirmish at Mumfordsville, on the south side of the Green River. In eastern Kentucky Col. James A. Garfield struck (Jan. 7, 1862) the Confederates, under Humphrey Marshall, near Prestonburg, on the Big Sandy River, and dispersed them. This ended Marshall's military career, and Garfield's services there won for him the commission of a brigadier-general. On the 19th, General Thomas defeated Gen. George B. Crittenden near Mill Spring, when General Zollicoffer was slain and his troops driven into northwestern Tennessee. This latter blow effectually severed the Confederate lines in Kentucky, and opened the way by which the Confederates were soon driven out of the State and also out of Tennessee. The Confederate line was paralyzed eastward of Bowling Green, and their chief fortifications and the bulk of their troops were between Nashville and Bowling Green and the Mississippi. On that line wa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
governor, with Bowling Green the new seat of government......Nov. 18, 1861 Confederate Congress admits Kentucky as a State......Dec. 9, 1861 Self-styled legislative council of Kentucky assembles within the Confederate lines and elects ten delegates to the Confederate Congress at Richmond......Dec. 14, 1861 At Middle Creek, Floyd county, Col. James A. Garfield routs the Confederates under Col. Humphrey Marshall......Jan. 10, 1862 Battle of Mill Springs, Pulaski county; Maj.-Gen. George B. Crittenden and Brigadier-General Zollicoffer attack the approaching Federals under Maj.-Gen. George H. Thomas; General Zollicoffer is killed and the Confederates routed......Jan. 19-20, 1862 General Buckner evacuates Bowling Green......Feb. 14, 1862 Confederates evacuate Columbus, Feb. 27; Federals take possession......March 3, 1862 Brig.-Gen. John H. Morgan, with his Confederate cavalry or rangers (900 men), begins his first Kentucky raid in Monroe county......July 8, 1862 Pri
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
te army at Bowling Green organization of Provisional government at Russellvllle George W. Johnson chosen Federate defeat at Fishing Creek, called by Federals battle of Mill Springs a serious disaster death of General Zollicoffer General George B. Crittenden critical position of General Johnston at Bowling Green fall of Fort Henry Generals Floyd and Buckner sent with their divisions to defend Fort Donelson. Before entering upon an account of the military operations which eventuated i either army impracticable, General Zollicoffer's command was transferred to Monticello, placing him in closer connection with General Johnston and looking to the better protection of the right flank. His force was also increased, and Maj.-Gen. Geo. B. Crittenden assigned to its command. Evidences of increased Federal activity were shown on General Johnston's left. The Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, which had been low, were made navigable for gunboats by the early winter rains; and General
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
witzers, left Kingston yesterday and should reach London, Ky., Sunday. It was the most brilliant conception of the war, as bold as Lee's move to Gettysburg, and requiring the dash and nerve of Stonewall Jackson. Besides, it was not a single column; it was four, the failure of either one involving disaster and possible destruction to all. His route was through a mountainous country depleted of supplies by both armies, and covering the territory in which Zollicoffer had lost his life and Crittenden's army had been annihilated; through which also Thomas and Schoepf and Morgan had for a year tried to cover the ground, which he, against a greater force than they had ever encountered, proposed to occupy in a few days. His programme, as sketched above, was carried out with the precision of a chess problem. Col. John S. Scott, with a force of 869 men, styled the Kirby Smith brigade, composed of the First Louisiana cavalry, Lieut.--Col. Jas. O. Nixon; the First Georgia cavalry, Col. J. J.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
d by a large body of troops there, moved on the 1st of October in the direction of Bardstown on five roads, the Shelbyville, Taylorsville, Bardstown, Shepherdsville, and Lebanon turnpikes; McCook's corps on the left, Gilbert's in the center and Crittenden's on the right. General Sill's division of McCook's corps marched on the Shelbyville pike, advancing on the 3rd as far as Clay Village, 16 miles from Frankfort, as a feint on the latter place. General Polk—who had been directed in case of antil 5:40p. m., it was understood that the attack would be made at daylight, October 8th, and that Bragg would start to Versailles early, and have Polk follow after defeating the Federal force at Perryville. His idea evidently was that neither Crittenden's nor Mc-Cook's corps was in supporting distance of Gilbert's corps, and that he could crush that fraction of Buell's army by a sudden attack and then concentrate for a general engagement. But in this he was mistaken, as the official publicati
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
tle raged along the whole line, which it not continuous, faced in the same direction. But when the center gave way, the whole line recoiled and the Confederates held the entire battlefield. Yet, while the enemy had retired and no longer replied with his musketry, his artillery, actively plied, indicated that he had not retreated far. On the contrary there were ominous reports of danger on the Lebanon road, and apprehensions arose of being taken in left and rear by a reinforcement from Crittenden's delayed corps, as reports of their approach came in by cavalry. Our advance having placed Perryville in our rear with comparatively no protection, the appearance of an infantry force there would have had a disastrous effect; but fortunately it did not occur. The sun went down in a cloudless sky as red in the autumnal haze and smoke of battle as the blood upon which it had looked, while almost simultaneously the full moon, its counterpart in bloody mien, rose opposite. Still the artill
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
. H. Hill. When General Bragg moved out of Chattanooga to attack Rosecrans' flanking corps, his Federal opponent thought he was in full retreat toward Rome. Crittenden's corps was therefore started after him and proceeded as far as Ringgold, when it was discovered that the report was false. Bragg's whole army was between the f Rosecrans', which were almost fifty miles apart. He tried to crush the right wing under Thomas at McLemore's Cove, but it evaded battle and with McCook's and Crittenden's corps turned toward Chattanooga for better security. Bragg then also moved towards Chattanooga, aiming to intercept Rosecrans and cut him off from his strongf nearly equal length, the Federals near and a little in front of the main Chattanooga road, McCook's corps on the right, his right resting on Crawfish Springs, Crittenden's in center, and Thomas' on the left, and the Confederates a few hundred yards east of them. It had been Bragg's intention to attack early in the morning, bu
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
thers less known. Kentucky contributed to the Confederate army a large number of able and distinguished officers, some of whom from their residence are credited to other States, but most of whom went directly from Kentucky. The following is the list with their rank: General Albert Sidney Johnston (Texas.) Lieutenant-General Simon Bolivar Buckner. Lieutenant-General John B. Hood (Texas). Lieutenant-General Richard Taylor (Louisiana). Major-Generals John C. Breckinridge, George B. Crittenden, William Preston, Gustavus W. Smith. Brigadier-Generals John. H. Morgan, Daniel W. Adams (Louisiana), Roger W. Hanson, Basil W. Duke, Abram Buford, Geo. B. Cosby, John S. Williams, James M. Hawes, Ben Hardin Helm, George B. Hodge, Claiborne F. Jackson (Missouri), Joseph H. Lewis, Samuel B. Maxey (Texas), H. B. Lyon, Randall L. Gibson (Louisiana), Thomas H. Taylor. The number of the rank and file in the Confederate army can only be estimated, but the total number of officers and me
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix B. (search)
terrified and some of the troops were discouraged. The discouragement was spreading, and I ordered the command to Murfreesboro, where I managed, by assembling Crittenden's division and the fugitives from Donelson, to collect an army able to offer battle. The weather was inclement, the floods excessive, and the bridges were washe, I suppose, at Corinth. One regiment of Hardee's division, Lieutenant-Colonel Patton commanding, is moving by cars today (20th March), and Statham's brigade, Crittenden's division. The brigade will halt at Iuka, the regiment at Burnsville. Cleburne's brigade, Hardee's division, except regiment at Burnsville, and Carroll's brigade, Crittenden's division, and Helm's cavalry at Tuscumbia; Bowen's brigade at Courtland; Breckinridge's brigade here; the regiments of cavalry of Adams and Wharton on the opposite bank of the river; Scott's Louisiana cavalry at Pulaski, sending forward supplies; Morgan's cavalry at Shelbyville, ordered on. Tomorrow Breckinridg
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