Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Crittenden or search for Crittenden in all documents.

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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Legal justification of the South in secession. (search)
tes government toward our commissioners in Washington. A Peace Convention was held in Washington City, with representatives from border and other States, to devise terms of honorable adjustment and prevent the calamity of war or disunion. Mr. Crittenden, of Kentucky, a statesman of experience, ability and conservatism, submitted a series of compromise measures and they were indignantly and insultingly rejected. The speaker of the house of representatives was not allowed even to present certeasures and they were indignantly and insultingly rejected. The speaker of the house of representatives was not allowed even to present certain proposed amendments to the Constitution, looking to pacification, while the convention in Virginia, so unwilling, so reluctant, to take extreme steps, tendered to Senator Crittenden, by a unanimous vote, the thanks of the people of the State for his able and patriotic efforts to bring about a just and honorable adjustment of our national difficulties.
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
ech made by such representative leaders as Mr. Crittenden, Mr. Stephens, Mr. Mason and Mr. Jeffersond December 20th, composed of Powell, Hunter, Crittenden, Seward, Toombs, Douglas, Collamer, JeffersoWade, Bigler, Rice, Doolittle and Grimes. Mr. Crittenden also offered his celebrated resolutions, uican supporters of the President-elect. Mr. Crittenden submitted to the committee the same joint th except a mere abstraction. (Buchanan.) Mr. Crittenden said: Peace and Harmony and Union in a gre out the entire preamble and resolution of Mr. Crittenden and insert as a substitute a preamble and f peace Northern leaders oppose Compromise Crittenden, Davis, Toombs and others urge conciliation posed. Mr. Trumbull, of Illinois, rebuked Mr. Crittenden for talking to the North about compromise itted even to the Congress at Washington. Mr. Crittenden, on the 22d of July, seized the opportunitsed the passage of the panic resolution of Mr. Crittenden, contributed, however, to a change of the [6 more...]
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
igadier-general July 21, 1862, he hung upon Buell's flank during the movement into Kentucky, protected Bragg's retreat, and while the army was in winter quarters actively covered the Federal front at Nashville, continually doing damage to the enemy. In 1863, in an effort to break Rosecrans' communications, he entered Tennessee with less than one thousand men, captured Mc-Minnville, and surprised the garrison of 2,000 at Murfreesboro, capturing all the survivors of the fight, including General Crittenden. General Streight, having started on a cavalry raid to Rome, Ga., was pursued and caught up with, and so impressed by Forrest's demand for surrender, that he turned over his entire command, which was in such disproportion to their captors that Forrest had to press into service all the citizens in reach to assist in forming an adequate guard. In the great battle of Chickamauga he commanded the cavalry of the right wing, and was distinguished in the fight, but he was so dissatisfied wi