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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John A. Crittenden or search for John A. Crittenden in all documents.

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ir: I beg leave to submit the following report of the operations during the three days siege of Frankfort: In compliance with special orders from Headquarters Kentucky State Guard, of date June ninth, I assumed command of the active forces in and around the city, and proceeded directly to place the city in a position for defence. The following gentlemen were appointed on my staff: Captain J. M. Mills, A. A. A. G. and Chief of Staff; Lieutenants John M. Hewitt, jr., Yoder Brown, and John A. Crittenden, Aides-de-Camp. 1 instructed Colonel Ed. Keenon, commanding Thirty-sixth regiment enrolled militia, and Lieutenant Denton, commanding Kentucky Scouts, to report to me immediately the available force under their command. The reports were promptly furnished; and I ascertained that my active force, consisting of cavalry and infantry, amounted to only one hundred and eighty-three men. With this force I had to defend the fort, arsenal, bridges, and all the roads leading into town. Feeling
main body of the army had also recrossed the North Anna, and was marching over the road toward the Pamunkey. All the corps had orders to recross after nightfall, leaving our pickets in front of the line until midnight. The three brigades of Crittenden's division, commanded by General Leslie and Colonels Marshall and Robinson, were ordered to take a stand on the north bank at Oxford, Quarles,and Jericho fords, respectively, and hold them until our pickets came on and take up and destroy the b leave the banks of the river until daylight, owing to the delay in getting the trains of the preceding corps into the roads. The enemy's pickets had discovered the withdrawal of ours, and followed them to the south bank, and fired across at Crittenden's division and Hancock's corps, killing and wounding several of our men. Generals Grant's and Meade's headquarters trains also received a volley before they could be moved off. Our line of march ran northwardly for some miles over the roads
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), General Grant's headquarters, near Hanovertown, south bank of the Pamunkey May 29, (search)
main body of the army had also recrossed the North Anna, and was marching over the road toward the Pamunkey. All the corps had orders to recross after nightfall, leaving our pickets in front of the line until midnight. The three brigades of Crittenden's division, commanded by General Leslie and Colonels Marshall and Robinson, were ordered to take a stand on the north bank at Oxford, Quarles,and Jericho fords, respectively, and hold them until our pickets came on and take up and destroy the b leave the banks of the river until daylight, owing to the delay in getting the trains of the preceding corps into the roads. The enemy's pickets had discovered the withdrawal of ours, and followed them to the south bank, and fired across at Crittenden's division and Hancock's corps, killing and wounding several of our men. Generals Grant's and Meade's headquarters trains also received a volley before they could be moved off. Our line of march ran northwardly for some miles over the roads