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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 241 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 222 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 141 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 141 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 131 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 86 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 80 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 68 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 63 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 54 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for George Crook or search for George Crook in all documents.

Your search returned 44 results in 6 document sections:

Winchester to the Potomac Jackson retreats Fremont strikes Ewell at Cross-Keys Jackson crosses the South Fork at Port Republic, and beats Tyler Heth routed by Crook at Lewisburg. the rooted inaction of the Army of the Potomac, See Vol. I., p. 627-9. with the Baltimlore and Ohio Railroad obstructed and broken up on its rJackson's demolition of Kenly at Front Royal, Gen. Heth, with 3 regiments of Virginia Rebels, attacked at Lewisburg, in West Virginia, the 36th and 44th Ohio, Col. Geo. Crook, by whom he was quickly routed, though Heth seems to have had decidedly the advantage in numbers. Before our artillery could be brought into position, the Rebels were broken and flying, with a loss of 4 guns, 300 muskets, and 100 prisoners. Our loss was 11 killed and 52 wounded, including Col. Crook in the foot. The Rebel loss is stated at 50 killed and 75 wounded, part of whom were doubtless included in the prisoners. Heth burnt the bridge over the Greenbrier, three miles distant,
train of wagons, and one of cars, was surrendered to him without a struggle, and where he burned a large quantity of supplies. But here he was overhauled by Gen. Geo. Crook, who, with another cavalry division, 2,000 strong, had started from Washington, Tenn., and had for some hours been pursuing and fighting Wharton, and by whosehere another fight Oct. 7. was had, and the Rebels worsted by the fire of Capt. Stokes's battery, followed by a charge of infantry, and lost 4 guns, captured by Crook, though lie was in inferior force. Wheeler got away during the night to Pulaski, and thence into North Alabama; making his escape across the Tennessee river, near the mouth of Elk; losing 2 more guns and his rear-guard of 70 men in getting over. Gens. Thomas and Crook estimate his loss during this raid at 2,000 men, mostly prisoners or deserters. Ours, mainly in prisoners, must have exceeded that number; while the Government property destroyed must have been worth millions of dollars. Ro
t at Newmarket Averill worsted at Wytheville Crook's fight near Dublin Station Hunter's victory his forces were needed to repel the advance of Crook from the west. Crook had moved from CharlesCrook had moved from Charlestown simultaneously with Sigel's advance from Winchester; and — as if to preclude the last chance o bridge; so that, when Averill reached Dublin, Crook was gone, which left him no choice but to follllivan and Stahl--for neither the divisions of Crook nor Averill had then joined us; and it was quiistance. Hunter advanced to Staunton, where Crook and Averill — no considerable force having bee to Leesburg, and, turning over the command to Crook, repaired to Washington. Averill, moving fran artillery duel next day at Martinsburg; but Crook, having gained time to save his trains, crossee crests or ridges: the Army of West Virginia (Crook's) in front; the 19th corps (Emory's) half a m. There was some suspicion and uneasiness, in Crook's command, but no serious preparation. An h[15 more...]<
masking the movement of the bulk of his forces into Virginia, whither he retired next month. Of course, that ended the pressure on our lines east of Knoxville. Morgan remained in East Tennessee--hiding, as well as he could, the paucity of his numbers — till the 1st of June ; when he started on another raid, via Pound gap, into Kentucky; evading Gen. Burbridge, who was in that quarter with a superior force, meditating an advance into south-western Virginia, in concert with the advance of Crook and Averill up the Kanawha. Morgan had but 2,500 followers, and these not so well mounted as they would have been two years earlier. Still, sending forward small parties to purvey as many good horses as possible, he moved, so swiftly as he might, by Paintville, Hazel Green, Owingsville, Flemingsburg, and Maysville, into and through the richest part of the State ; capturing Mount Sterling, Paris, Cynthiana, and Williamstown, burning trains, tearing up railroads, &c., almost without resistan
Run Rosser's raid to Beverly capture of Kelly and Crook Sheridan up the Valley Annihilates Early at Waynesain at Sabine's Cross-roads Lee hastening westward Crook strikes him in flank is repulsed Custer strikes hit 3 A. M.; Feb. 21. seizing Maj.-Gens. Kelley and Crook in their beds, mounting them on horses, and hurryingeade, and henceforth commanding the cavalry only. Crook, now holding Sheridan's left (facing eastward), advae could arrive. The result justified the daring. Crook was repulsed; but meantime Custer, with his divisioncreek — a petty tributary of the Appomattox — where, Crook and Devin coming promptly to his support, he piercedon Danville. This was a miscalculation; and exposed Crook, who, with the remaining division, with difficulty fof course did not keep pace with them. Sheridan — Crook having already, by order, recrossed the Appomattox —ers on Prospect station, and pushed on Merritt's and Crook's divisions briskly to Appomattox station, on the L
ands a division at Malvern Hill, 165. Catlett's Station, Pope's headquarters surprised at, 178; Stuart surprises Warren at, 395. Cedar creek, Early surprises Crook at, 613; Sheridan triumphs at, 614-15; officers killed at, 615. Cedar Mountain, battle and map of, 176; Jackson defeats Banks at, 177. Centerville, Lee chases, opinion of Gov. H. Seymour on, 499. Crittenden, Col. Geo. B., treachery of, 19; relieves Zollicoffer, 42. Crocker, Brig.-Gen., at Champion Hills, 308. Crook, Gen., surprised at Cedar Creek, 613. Cross, Col., 5th N. H., killed at Gettysburg, 388. Cross-Keys, Va., Fremont fights at, 138-9. Croxton, Gen., at Chicountain — is forced to fall back, 177; commands Jackson's division at Antietam, 206; at Gettysburg, 380 to 387; menaces Washington — is repulsed, 605; he surprises Crook at Cedar Creek, 613; Sheridan routs him at Cedar Creek, 614-5; again routed at Waynesboro, 727. East Point, Ga. Sherman's operations at, 636. Ector, Brig.-Ge