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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 39 9 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 33 3 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 29 3 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 27 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 24 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 23 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 21 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Crook or search for Crook in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
army of the Mountain, so called, occupied West Virginia, which the Confederates had entirely abandoned since the end of January. One of his brigades, commanded by Crook, was posted on the banks of Greenbrier River, while the remainder of his troops were encamped at Moorefield, and Franklin in some of the numerous valleys which str mountains of West Virginia. On leaving these mountains, Edward Johnson had entrusted to General Heth the task of watching with three regiments the brigade of Colonel Crook, which occupied the beautiful valley of the Greenbrier, with its station at Lewisburg. Carried away by his zeal, Heth crossed the river to attack his adversarty solely to the Greenbrier River, the bridges of which it succeeded in destroying in its rear. But this advantage was of no benefit whatever to the Federals; for Crook was not sufficiently strong to venture among the difficult mountain passes which separated him from Jackson's base of operations, and which it would have been nece
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
patched an order to Burnside directing him to commence the assault, carry the bridge and attack Longstreet on the other side. Unfortunately, Burnside, instead of conforming to this order by making a general attack, contented himself with sending Crook's small brigade against the defenders of the bridge. This movement was only supported by two regiments of the division of Sturgis. Crook, received by a vigorous discharge of musketry, was promptly repulsed. Rodman's brigade, which was to haveCrook, received by a vigorous discharge of musketry, was promptly repulsed. Rodman's brigade, which was to have crossed at a ford below the bridge, met with no better success. Sturgis then sent his two regiments to renew the charge; but notwithstanding his perseverance, he could not even reach the bridge. Two hours were thus wasted in successive efforts on the part of detachments too feeble for the work— efforts that were at once sanguinary and fruitless. Thus, while the contest was increasing on the right, the left still continued motionless. In vain did McClellan send messenger after messenger to
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
September, 1862. Commander-in-chief, Major-General McClellan. Right wing, Burnside. 1st corps, Hooker; 14,850 men strong. 1st Division, Meade. 1st Brigade, Seymour; 2d Brigade, Gallagher; 3d Brigade, Magilton. 2d Division, Ricketts. 1st Brigade, Hartsuff; 2d Brigade, Christian; 3d Brigade, Duryea. 3d Division, Doubleday. 1st Brigade, Patrick; 2d Brigade, Gibbon; 3d Brigade, Phelps. 9th corps, Reno (afterward Cox); 13,819 men strong. 1st Division, Cox. 1st Brigade, Crook; 2d Brigade, Brooks; 3d Brigade, Scammon. 2d Division, Wilcox. 1st Brigade, ......; 2d Brigade, ..... 3d Division, Sturgis. 1st Brigade, Ferrero; 2d Brigade, ...... 4th Division, Rodman. 1st Brigade, Harland; 2d Brigade, Fairchild. Centre, Sumner. 2d corps, Sumner; 18,813 men strong. 1st Division, Richardson. 1st Brigade, Caldwell; 2d Brigade, Meagher. 2d Division, Sedgwick. 1st Brigade, Gorman; 2d Brigade, Dana; 3d Brigade, Howard. 3d Division, French. 1st Briga