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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 241 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 222 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 141 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 141 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 131 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 86 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 80 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 68 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 63 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 54 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for George Crook or search for George Crook in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.33 (search)
garrison the Lower Kanawha Valley, I sent forward another under Colonel Crook on the Lewisburg Turnpike, whilst I moved in person with the twh the rest of the two brigades on this line were at the East liver, Crook's brigade occupying Lewisburg. We were thus prepared to join Fremof Marshall as senior. My own orders required me to converge toward Crook's line of movement as I advanced, and from Flat-top Mountain my linn to retire to Flat-top Mountain, a very strong position, directing Crook on the other side of New River to halt at Lewisburg, where we couldort each other. On May 23d Heth with his brigade tried to dislodge Crook, but was beaten, with the loss of 38 killed and many wounded, of whom 66 fell into our hands. Crook also captured 4 cannon and 300 stand of small-arms. Crook's loss was 13 killed, 53 wounded, and 7 missing.Crook's loss was 13 killed, 53 wounded, and 7 missing. When General Pope assumed command he directed a defensive policy to be pursued in West Virginia, and made arrangements to transfer part o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
ard Ferrero: 21st Mass., Col. William S. Clark; 51st N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Robert B. Potter; 51st Pa., Col. John F. Hartranft. Brigade loss: k, 33; w, 156; m, 69 == 258. Kanawha division. First Provisional Brigade (engaged only at Bull Run Bridge, August 27th), Col. E. Parker Scarmmon: 11th Ohio, Maj. Lyman J. Jackson, Lieut.-Col. Augustus H. Coleman; 12th Ohio, Col. Carr B. White. Brigade loss: k, 14; w, 50; m, 42 = 106. Unattached, 30th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Theodore Jones; 36th Ohio, Col. George Crook. The loss of the Union army in the battles of August 29th and 30th is not separately reported. In all the combats of the campaign from the Rappahannock to the Potomac, the casualties amounted (approximately) to 1747 killed, 8452 wounded, and 4263 captured or missing = 14,462. The Confederate forces. Army of Northern Virginia--General Robert E. Lee. right wing, or Longstreet's Corps, Maj.-Gen. James Longstreet. Anderson's division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson. Armis
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
Ninth Corps (Reno's) consisted of four divisions under Cox, Willcox, Sturgis, and Rodman; or eight brigades — Scammon and Crook (Cox); Christ and Welsh (Willcox); Nagle and Ferrero (Sturgis); and Fair-child and Harland (Rodman). It had 29 regiments n the field about 3:30.--Editors General Cox, who fought Garland, had six Ohio regiments under Brigadiers Scammon and Crook, and also the batteries of McMullin and Simmonds, and three companies of cavalry. The heavy batteries in position (20-po. The falling back of Cox's division is alluded to by Colonel Ewing of Scammon's brigade and by Major Lyman J. Jackson of Crook's brigade. The former says: We fell back to the original position until the general advance at 5 P. M. Major Jackson, afopriety. This is especially so with those who bore the heat and burden of the day,--Meade, Hatch, Cox, Willcox, Scammon, Crook, Gibbon, Ewing, Gallagher, Magilton, Phelps, White, Jackson, Callis, Bragg, and others. In regard to the casualties of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Forcing Fox's Gap and Turner's Gap. (search)
we shall see. His brigade passed to the command of Colonel George Crook, of the 36th Ohio. Frederick was a loyal city, aonsisted of the 12th, 23d, and 30th Ohio regiments; that of Crook, which was left in camp, was made up of the 11th, 28th, andand told him that I should follow him in close support with Crook's brigade, and as I went back along the column I spoke to eit might be a battle. Hurrying back to the camp, I ordered Crook to turn out his brigade prepared to march at once. I then informed him that I had determined to support Scammon with Crook, and if it became necessary to fight with the whole divisioll up toward the gap. It was about half-past 7 o'clock when Crook's column filed off on the old Sharpsburg road, Scammon havil along the upper side, with the forest again beyond this. Crook was brought up close in his rear. The ascent and the forma to get away toward our right. The 11th Ohio was sent from Crook's brigade beyond Scammon's left, where part of the enemy's
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
lmore's Co., W. Va. Cav., Lieut. James Abraham; Harrison's Co., W. Va. Cav., Lieut. Dennis Delaney. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 63; w, 201; m, 8 == 272. Antietam, k, 28; w, 134; inn, 20 == 182. Second Brigade, Col. Augustus Moor (c), Col. George Crook: 11th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Augustus H. Coleman (k), Maj. Lyman J. Jackson; 28th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Gottfried Becker; 36th Ohio, Col. George Crook, Lieut.-Col. Melvin Clarke (k), Maj. E. B. Andrews; Chicago (111). Dragoons, Capt. Frederick SchamCol. George Crook, Lieut.-Col. Melvin Clarke (k), Maj. E. B. Andrews; Chicago (111). Dragoons, Capt. Frederick Schambeck; Ky. Battery, Capt. Seth J. Simmonds. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 17; w, 64; m, 3 == 84. Antietam, k, 8; w, 58; m, 7 == 73. unattached troops: 6th N. Y. Cav. (8 co's), Col. Thomas C. Devin; 3d Co. Ohio Cav., Lieut. Jonas Seamen; L and M, 3d U. S. Art'y, Capt. John Edwards, Jr. Twelfth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Joseph K. F. Mansfield (k), Brig.-Gen. Alpheus S. Williams. Staff loss: Antietam, k, 1. Escort: L, 1st Mich. Cav., Capt. Melvin Brewer. first division, Brig.-Gen. Alp
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
ided, Scammon's brigade going with Rodman, and Crook's going with Sturgis. Crook was ordered to tadivision occupied the center of our line, with Crook's brigade of the Kanawha Division on his rightivision in reserve, as I have already stated. Crook's position was somewhat above the bridge, but ridge. The orders were accordingly given, and Crook advanced, covered by the 11th Connecticut (of hers. In passing over the spurs of the hills, Crook came out on the bank of the stream above the bless vigorously continued with musketry fire. Crook reported that his hands were full, and that heel the necessity of success. At the same time Crook succeeded in bringing a light howitzer of Simmoyed, and the rest of Sturgis's division, with Crook's brigade, were immediately brought over to st accordingly. The ammunition of Sturgis's and Crook's men had been nearly exhausted, and it was ime road leading from the bridge to Sharpsburg. Crook's brigade of the Kanawha Division supported Wi[4 more...]