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ports of ships destined for the use of belligerents; and your memorialists would further suggest to your Lordship the importance of endeavoring to secure the assent of the Government of the United States of America, and of other foreign countries, to the adoption of similar regulations in those countries also. All which your memorialists respectfully submit. Signed, Thomas Chilton, Jones, Palmer & Co., Farnworth & Jardine, Thos. & Jas. Harrison, L. H. Macintyre, Potter brothers, Chas. Geo. Cowre & Co., M. J. Sealby, R. Gervin & Co., J. Aikin, Finlay, Campbell & Co., Cropper, Ferguson & Co., J. Campbell, S. R. Graves, Rankin, Gilmore & Co., Rathbone Bros. & Co., James Brown & Co., Liverpool, June 9, 1863. James Poole & Co., W. T. Jacob, Henry Moore & Co., Imrie & Tomlinson, Sampson & Holt, James Barnes, Richard Nicholson & son, W. B. Boadle, J. Prowse & Co., Currie, Newton & Co., Nelson, Alexander & Co., Kendall brothers, C. T. Bowrin & Co., G. H. Fletcher & Co., Alfred Holt.
istrict South-East Missouri, Cairo, November 8, 1861. Colonel R. J. Oglesby, commanding, &c., Bird's Point. Mo.: You will take command of an expedition consisting of your regiment, four companies of the Eleventh Illinois, all of the Eighteenth and Twenty-ninth, three companies of cavalry from Bird's Point (to be selected and notified by yourself), and a section of Schwartz's battery artillery, and proceed by steamboats to Commerce, Missouri. From Commerce you will strike for Sikeston, Mr. Cropper acting as guide. From there you will go in pursuit of a rebel force, understood to be three thousand strong, under Jeff. Thompson, now at Indian ford, on the St. Francis river. An expedition has already left Ironton, Missouri, to attack this force. Should they learn that they have left that place it will not be necessary for you to go there, but pursue the enemy in any direction he may go, always being cautious not to fall in with an unlooked — for foe too strong for the command unde
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Slavery. (search)
nd her beautiful prairies will beat the banks of the Ganges. Free America from the incubus of slavery, and Yankee skill in the fruitful valleys of the South will beat England and British India in any market in the world. I beg permission to read to the meeting the message of one who may justly be considered a far higher authority than any who have spoken from this platform; and observe, this is not an after-thought. It is not a new project, for years back it had the devoted advocacy of Cropper, and fifteen years ago, Clarkson, in a private letter to a friend, suggested it as the only remedy for slavery in the transatlantic world. You will pardon me for reading a portion of the speech the venerable Clarkson prepared in writing, and intended to deliver at the opening of the General Antislavery Convention:-- My dear friends, you have a most difficult task to perform; it is neither more nor less than the extirpation of slavery from the whole world. Your opponents who appear th
t southeast Missouri, Cairo, November 3, 1861. Colonel R. J. Oglesby, commanding, etc.,< Bird's Point, Missouri: You will take command of an expedition, consisting of your regiment, four companies of the Eleventh Illinois, all of the Eighteenth and Twenty-ninth, three companies of cavalry from Bird's point (to be selected and notified by yourself), and a section of Swartz's battery, artillery, and proceed by steamboats to Commerce, Missouri. From Commerce you will strike for Sikeston, Mr. Cropper acting as guide. From there you will go in pursuit of a rebel force, understood to be three thousand strong, under Jeff Thompson, now at Indian ford, on the St. Francis river. An expedition has already left Ironton, Missouri, to attack this force. Should they learn that they have left that place, it will not be necessary for you to go there, but pursue the enemy in any direction he may go, always being cautious not to fall in with an unlooked — for foe, too strong for the command und
The City Guard is the name recently adopted by the Company under the command of Capt. Cropper. The original title of "Fire-Side Protectors" was not military enough to suit the times.
uck Finn, a scuffle ensued, and he aimed a pistol at Finn, but did not fire it, because his arm was struck down. There was some further testimony, but nothing bearing especially upon either of the parties accused. Mr. Finn declared his purpose of getting out a warrant against Wayne for shooting at him, which he could prove. The Mayor said that he could go before the Grand Jury and present Mr. Wayne, if he thought proper; but in the meantime he would require security in the sum of $150 for his good behavior and for his appearance at Court. Mr. Curry was discharged. John Boltz and John Fink appeared to answer for the delinquencies of their sons in throwing rocks in the streets; but they satisfied the Mayor that they had whipped their boys soundly, and escaped without a fine. The following fines were imposed for keeping bar-rooms open after ten o'clock at night: John Charles, $5; Cropper & Herrin, $5; Jas. Burns, $10. Several other trivial cases were disposed of.
ed Wright's wife because the latter objected to a negro girl pitching wood on her head out of the third story window of the tenement jointly occupied by both. Wright deemed it proper to redress his wife's wrongs, and so proceeded to Meyer's room, and the subsequent proceedings took place. Wright was required to give $250 security for his good behavior, and did so. Bernard Meyer was also required to give security to restrain his impetuosity, as was Philip Meisel, who somehow became mixed up in the affair. Policeman Griffin entered a complaint against Wm. McDowell, for being proprietor of a one-horse wagon; which it was claimed he propelled about for hire without providing himself with a license. He was fined. August Green, charged with trespassing on Henry Hardesty, on the Basin, Sunday, while drunk, was delivered to his captain, Cropper. Geo. Rigley, an escaped prisoner from the Lynchburg jail, where he is charged with horse stealing, was committed to be sent back.
hnson's artillery, suspicion. Committed 28th March.--Christopher Bolton, Henrico, disloyalty; L P Maines, Baltimore, --; M P Morse, Matthews co, Va, disloyalty. Committed 31st March.--Michael Gately, desertion; S Z Howard, 14th Ala., desertion; Thos Johnson, desertion; W C Hughes, --; Thos Leonard, 14th Ala., assault and battery; Patrick Murphy, Magruder's Artillery,--. Committed 1st April.--J S Brantwhite, Richmond, Union man; George White, Baltimore, desertion; John Hughes, Cropper's corps, desertion. Committed 2d April.--Samuel McGoe Alias Dockerty, Livinston dragoons, --; John S O' Brien, Richmond, desertion; Tim, O Brien, desertion; Mike Murphy, --; W Fitzgerald, desertion, after engaging as a substitute; Wm Ryan, 19th Miss., do. Committed 3d April.--John Smith,--; Tim Webster, Mrs Webster, Kentucky, spies; Nicholas Luise, --; Mike Cuppy, Appomattox, --; John Fallon, guard, breach of discipline; Wm Miller, do., do; Mike Ambrain, political prisoner; Mike F
Depredations on James River. A letter to the Petersburg Express, dated Cabin Point, Surry county, July 28th,says: Last night a small Yankee steam tug, carrying one gun, ventured up the peaceful waters of the upper Chip Oak Creek and carried off a lighter heavily laden with wood, which was lying at White House wharf. The lighter belonged to Captain Myers. They also stole a fine schooner belonging to Major Wm. Allen, of Claremont. The schooner was in charge or Captain Cropper. It is supposed that the Lincoln thieves were piloted up the creek by Captain B. F. Fowlkes, who formerly resided near Cabin Point, and ran a vessel up the creek during two years or more. The waters about Berkeley, I hear, are crowded with Federal transports, all of which could be easily reached by heavy guns on the south bank of James river. Is there another nation in the world which would allow a hostile fleet to float undisturbed in its very centre, when it could be so easily scattered if n
mara, C, 17th Miss. P Tierman, C, 17th Miss. W Collins, C, 17th Miss. J Pavy, H, 30th Va. Conrad Fleasing, K, 13th La. W. Tippan, 1st Ga. W Ponyman, 1st Ga. W Henny, B, 6th La. W S Pomdexter, McMullen 2d Bal Heavy Art. G Lewis, Cropper's Art. A Gardner, Cropper's Art. M Shaw, A, 12th Ala. J R Woodward, Sands's Battery. R Alley, Johnson's Battery. Samuel Burns, B, Marine Corps. E Ellinger, E, 10th Va Cav. J H Abbott, B, Morris's Art. C Rose, F, 10th La. D TrCropper's Art. M Shaw, A, 12th Ala. J R Woodward, Sands's Battery. R Alley, Johnson's Battery. Samuel Burns, B, Marine Corps. E Ellinger, E, 10th Va Cav. J H Abbott, B, Morris's Art. C Rose, F, 10th La. D Tracy, F, 1st Ga. T Murphy, F, 1st Ga. J Ryan, H, 8th Ala. T D Ackeman, Capt Duke's Texas Vol. M Murphy, Capt Duke's Texas Vol. Sergt M Maghan, Capt Duke's Texas Vol. M McCloskey, G. 8th Ala. J Othiel, Capt Ritter's Bar. J Usean, D, 6th La. J Hogan, 3d Md Art. J Caliahan, D, 14th Ala. C Oaks, Washington Art. W H Howell, H, 2d Ga. W Collins, I. 4th La. S B Harston, F, 21st Ga. J J Driscoll, C, 2d Va Cav. P White, Hamilton Bat. M Sullivan, Morton's Art. W Payton,
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