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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for George H. Crosman or search for George H. Crosman in all documents.

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awk War Lieutenant Johnston was thrown into the intimate relations of camp-life with his brother officers; and the favor in which he was before held by them was increased by his share in the campaign. In a letter to the writer, from Major-General George H. Crosman, United States Army (retired), written in 1873, occurs the following, giving voice to this opinion: Your father acquired a very high reputation for his wise and successful conduct during the Black-Hawk War. Captain Eaton relates aipation of happiness his refuge in affliction. He was a man who, alike from temperament and philosophy, shrank from the exhibition or indulgence of great emotion; and to such, in the season of grief, solitude is the most acceptable friend. General Crosman, who was as much in his confidence as any man, says that he was in great distress of mind. He had left his children, who were so young as to require female care, in charge of their grandmother, Mrs. Preston, at Louisville, with a vague inte
l times to be assumed, and I shall not shrink from it. As I will do no one thing which my conscience does not approve as beneficial to my country, I shall always be without fear, and, I hope, without reproach. The arrival, in October, of Colonel Crosman, who had been assigned as his chief quartermaster, was a source of great relief to General Johnston. His predecessor had done his part well, but Crosman was an old and tried friend, in whose experience, good sense, and loyalty of heart, heCrosman was an old and tried friend, in whose experience, good sense, and loyalty of heart, he placed an unbounded trust, which was never impaired. It is sufficient to say that this well-administered army passed the winter not only contentedly but cheerfully, bringing to their aid the recreations and amusements of civilized life without relaxation of discipline, or of the vigilance necessary to a strict performance of their duties. General Johnston applied again for a leave of absence, to take effect in the spring, but without success. In regard to the relations established by