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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 3 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for E. E. Cross or search for E. E. Cross in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

the enemy having also reenforced. Our batteries, meantime, were shelling the forests vigorously, which evidently disconcerted the enemy. Howard now ordered Col. E. E. Cross, of the Fifth New-Hampshire, to charge bayonets, the enemy having appeared in a skirt of woods within one hundred yards, with evident design to charge. Cred his reliable fellows in the thickest of the fray, way now disabled and carried to the rear. His aid-de-camp and brother, Lieut. Howard, also fell wounded. Colonel Cross took command, the enemy having begun to fall back. Col. Miller of the Eighty-first Pennsylvania, and Lieut.-Col. Massett, of the Sixty-first New-York, were kises, while their wounded, moaning with agony, were scattered through the forests in every direction. But our own casualty list is formidable. Our friend, Col. E. E. Cross, well known in the West a few years ago as editor, correspondent, etc., and later as an emigrant to Arizona, where he was a conspicuous citizen, raged like a
His master, Mr. Garlick, is a refugee at present in Richmond. His farm, in Waterloo, is situated on the Pamunkey, six miles above the White House. He left home on the approach of the enemy, who, until dislodged on Friday, have been in quiet possession of his premises. We give Selden's account: His business was that of a weaver, but the Yankees on their arrival, destroyed his loom and put him to work in his master's corn and flour-mill, where he was employed when taken by our cavalry. Mr. Cross, a negro named Moses, and himself were running the mill. The Yankees took all the flour the mill could turn out, and paid cash for it. The Yankees had not injured anything of Mr. Garlick's except the loom, but they had treated Selden, individually, very badly. They took all his eggs and wrung all his chickens' necks and eat them before his eyes, and would not give him a cent. All of his master's negroes were at home. They were afraid to go with the Yankees. Being interrogated as to