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the first designated halting-place on the route to Bottom Bridge. The morning, like many succeeding ones, was cloudy and threatening rain, and for the first mile the route lay through an opening in the woods, the road being in many places flooded, and in others very badly rutted and cut up. At eight o'clock the sun came out warmly, which seemed to increase the hilarity and good humor of the men, as they sang, joked, and laughed along the road. The first point of interest reached was St. Peter's Church, where General Washington was married. The memories attached to the sacred edifice from this circumstance appeared to be known to many in the ranks — men who served in the Peninsula campaign — and, from time to time, as the church came in view, the veterans pointed it out to their younger companions, with an explanation of the interest attached to it. Once or twice the columns had to be halted from the impediments on the broken roads; but these halts were of short duration, General Ke
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
eneral Porter's command was withdrawn on the evening of the 29th, and returned to its old position with the main army. The campaign had taken its present position in consequence of the assurance that I should be joined by McDowell's corps. As it was now clear that I could not count with certainty upon that force, I had to do the best I could with the means at hand. the first necessity was to establish secure communications between the two parts of the army, necessarily separated St. Peter's Church, near New Kent Court House. Hotel. Factory. Record Office — Court House. Ruins of Jail. New Kent Court House. From a sketch made May 19, 1862. by the Chickahominy. Richmond could be attacked only by troops on the right bank. As the expectation of the advance of McDowell was still held out, and that only by the land route, I could not yet transfer the base to the James, but was obliged to retain it on the Pamunkey, and therefore to keep on the left bank a force sufficient to pro
Chapter 22: White House the Chickahominy river bridges battle of Hanover Court House Porter's victory neglect at Washington McDowell's retention useless. White House was a very fine plantation belonging to Mrs. Gen. Lee. It was the residence of Mrs. Custis when she was married to Washington. The ceremony took place in St. Peter's Church, a lonely old building beautifully placed on a commanding hill. I observed within it a tablet commemorating a death which took place in 1690. Finding one's self alone within that historic building, it was a natural impulse to invoke the aid of God to enable me to serve the country as unselfishly and truly as did the great man who had often worshipped there. The residence at White House was not the original building of the time of Washington — that had been destroyed by fire; but the existing one was constructed on the same foundations. I neither occupied it myself nor permitted any others to do so, but placed a guard to
arge was repeated only to be repulsed. Then came the order to fix bayonets. Five regiments-Thirty-fourth and Eighty-second New York, Fifteenth and Twentieth Massachusetts and Seventh Michigan--pushed Sumner in the field — a general full of years and honors. Not many men distinguished in the war could look back upon forty-two years of actual service at the outbreak of hostilities. But such was the case with General Edwin V. Sumner. He stands above in the Peninsula Campaign, at St. Peter's church, near New Kent Court House, Virginia, not far from White House Landing. In this sacred edifice George Washington had worshiped. When this picture was taken Sumner was one year past the age when generals of the present day are deemed too old for service. Commanding the Second Army Corps in the Peninsula Campaign, he was twice wounded; and again, leading his men at Antietam, once more he was struck. He fought again at Fredericksburg, but died from the effects of his wounds in March,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andre, John, 1751- (search)
or his table. Washington did not have a personal interview with Andre, but treated him as leniently as the rules of war would allow. The captors of Major Andre were John Paulding, David Williams, and Isaac Van Wart. Washington recommended Congress to reward them for their fidelity. They were each presented with a silver medal, and they were voted a pension of $200 a year each in silver or its equivalent. Monuments have been erected to the memory of the captors — to Paulding, in St. Peter's church-yard, near Peekskill; to Van Wart, by the citizens of Westchester county, in 1829, in the Presbyterian church-yard at Greenburg, of which church the captor was an active officer and chorister for many years; and to Williams, in Schoharie county, N. Y. The King caused a monument to be placed in Westminster Abbey to the memory of Andre. It seems to be quite out of place among the worthies of England, for he was hanged as a spy, and was a plotter for the ruin of a people struggling fo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Paulding, John 1758-1818 (search)
Paulding, John 1758-1818 Patriot, and one of the captors of Andre; born in New York City in 1758. Three times he was made a prisoner during the Revolutionary War, Paulding's monument. and had escaped, the second time, only four days before the capture of Andre. He and his associates received from Congress a silver medal each, and were awarded an annuity of $200. In 1827 a marble monument was erected by the John Paulding. corporation of New York City in St. Peter's church-yard near Peekskill, as a memorial of him. He died in Staatsburg, N. Y., Feb. 18, 1818.
iamond Hill May 11. Brook Church or Fortifications of Richmond May 12. Meadow Bridge May 12. Jones' Bridge May 17. Haxall's Landing May 18. Milford May 20. Haw's Shop May 28. Old Church May 29-30. Cold Harbor May 31-June 1. About Cold Harbor June 1-7. Sumner's Upper Bridge and McGee's Mills June 2. Sheridan's Trevillian Raid June 7-24. Elliott's Mills June 8. Trevillian Station June 11-12. Black Creek, Tunstall Station, June 21. White House, St. Peter's Church, June 21. St. Mary's Church June 24. Second Swamp June 28. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June, 1864, to April, 1865. Warwick Swamp and Lee's Mill July 12. Deep Bottom July 27-28. New Market July 28. Malvern Hill July 29. Lee's Mills July 30. Near Sycamore Church August 9. Gravel Hill August 14. Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Deep Run August 16. Nelson's Farm August 18. Ream's Station August 23-25. Dinwiddie Road near Ream
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
r May 9-24. North Anna River May 9-10. Ground Squirrel Church, Ashland and Yellow Tavern May 11. Brooks' Church, or Richmond Fortifications, May 12. Line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor May 31-June 1. About Cold Harbor June 1-7. Sumner's Upper Bridge June 2. Sheridan's Trevillian Raid June 7-24. Trevillian Station June 11-12. Newark, or Mallory's Cross Roads, June 12. Black Creek, or Tunstall Station, and White House, or St. Peter's Church, June 21. St. Mary's Church June 24. Camp at Prince George Court House June 27-July 13. Weldon Railroad and Warwick Swamp July 12. At Lee's Mills till July 26. Demonstration on north side of James River July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Malvern Hill July 28. Lee's Mills July 30. Scouting duty till August 14. Demonstration north of James River August 14-18. Gravel Hill August 14. Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Charles City Cross Roads August 18.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
une 11-12. Newark, or Mallory's Cross Roads, June 12. Black Creek, or Tunstall's Station, and White House, or St. Peter's Church, June 21. Jones' Bridge June 23. Demonstration north of the James River July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28 11-12. Newark or Mallory's Cross Roads June 12. Black Creek or Tunstall's Station June 21. White House or St. Peter's Church June 21. Jones' Bridge June 23. Demonstration north of the James River July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28.ion June 11-12. Newark or Mallory's Cross Roads June 12. Black Creek or Tunstall's Station and White House or St. Peter's Church June 21. Jones' Bridge June 23. Muddy Branch, Md., July 26 (Detachment). Demonstration north of the James une 11-12. Newark, or Mallory's Cross Roads, June 12. Black Creek, or Tunstall's Station, and White House, or St. Peter's Church, June 21. Jones' Bridge June 23. Fort Stevens and along Northern Defenses of Washington July 11-12 (Detachmen
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New Jersey Volunteers. (search)
ldsburg May 9. North Anna River May 9-10. Ground Squirrel Church and Yellow Tavern May 11. Ashland May 11. Brooks' Church or fortifications of Richmond May 12. Line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Hawes' Shop May 28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor May 31-June 1. Sumner's Upper Bridge, Sheridan's Trevillian Raid, June 7-24. Trevillian Station June 11-12. Newark or Mallory's Cross Roads June 12. Black Creek or Tunstall Station June 21. White House of St. Peter's Church June 21. St. Mary's Church June 24. Near Petersburg June 29-July 12. Lee's Mills, Warwick Swamp, July 12. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Malvern Hill July 28. Ream's Station August 8. Demonstration north of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Gravel Hill August 14. Weldon Railroad August 18-21. Dinwiddie Road, near Ream's Station, August 23. Ream's Station August 25. Old members mustered
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