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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 18 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 43 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 18 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 3 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 12 0 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Preparations for battle-thomas Carries the first line of the enemy-sherman Carries Missionary Ridge--battle of Lookout Mountain--General Hooker's fight (search)
f the 15th corps, Army of the Tennessee; Geary's, 12th corps, Army of the Potomac; and [Charles] Cruft's, 14th corps, Army of the Cumberland. Geary was on the right at Wauhatchie, Cruft at the centrCruft at the centre, and Osterhaus near Brown's Ferry. These troops were all west of Lookout Creek. The enemy had the east bank of the creek strongly picketed and intrenched, and three brigades of troops in the reart. Early on the morning of the 24th Hooker moved Geary's division, supported by a brigade of Cruft's, up Lookout Creek, to effect a crossing. The remainder of Cruft's division was to seize the bCruft's division was to seize the bridge over the creek, near the crossing of the railroad. Osterhaus was to move up to the bridge and cross it. The bridge was seized by [Ferdinand H.] Gross's brigade after a slight skirmish with the mountain. The enemy, seeing their left flank and rear menaced, gave way, and were followed by Cruft and Osterhaus. Soon these were up abreast of Geary, and the whole command pushed up the hill, d
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Battle of Chattanooga-a gallant charge-complete Rout of the enemy-pursuit of the Confederates--General Bragg--remarks on Chattanooga (search)
ooga, troops from the Army of the Potomac, from the Army of the Tennessee, and from the Army of the Cumberland participated. In fact, the accidents growing out of the heavy rains and the sudden rise in the Tennessee River so mingled the troops that the organizations were not kept together, under their respective commanders, during the battle. Hooker, on the right, had Geary's division of the 12th corps, Army of the Potomac; Osterhaus's division of the 15th corps, Army of the Tennessee; and Cruft's division of the Army of the Cumberland. Sherman had three divisions of his own army, Howard's corps from the Army of the Potomac, and Jefferson C. Davis's division of the Army of the Cumberland. There was no jealousy-hardly rivalry. Indeed, I doubt whether officers or men took any note at the time of the fact of this intermingling of commands. All saw a defiant foe surrounding them, and took it for granted that every move was intended to dislodge him, and it made no difference where th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
s upon Tunnel Hill. As the force of the enemy was entirely uncertain, Brigadier-General Cruft, with the First Brigade, was directed to attack the line in front, andsance was ordered toward evening. This was made by the First Brigade, Brigadier-General Cruft commanding. The Thirty-first Indiana and One hundred and first Ohio wcorps to hold the Dalton road running by my left flank. To do this I stationed Cruft's brigade upon the left of the road, posting two of his regiments upon a round-erable force upon the hills east of Kingston beyond the crossing of the creek. Cruft's and Whitaker's brigades were formed in line facing the enemy, and Colonel Groil the night of the 4th of June, during which the enemy evacuated his line. Cruft's brigade was started back to Kingston as escort to the wagon train of the corpsuccess, and proved a most energetic and efficient commander. He succeeded General Cruft in the command of the brigade after the battle of New Hope Church. Gene
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
ing the campaign commencing May 3 and ending September 8 in the occupation of Atlanta: From May 3 to June 10 Brigadier-General Cruft commanded the brigade, and for a report during that time I am restricted to information gained from regimental rth Illinois, attached to the One hundred and first Ohio, broke up camp at Ooltewah, Tenn., and, under command of Brigadier-General Cruft, marched out the road leading to Tunnel Hill, via Catdosa Springs; camped on a high ridge half a mile south of C June 9, Thirty-eighth Illinois joined the brigade, having returned from veteran furlough. On the morning of June 10 General Cruft was ordered to Chattanooga on account of severe sickness, and I had the honor to assume command. Moved out on the Buhis arduous campaign this brigade lost by sickness the valuable services and directions of its proper commander, Brigadier-General Cruft. For its comparative success since then I am indebted to the intelligent and untiring efforts of the regimental
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
relieved the front of General Hazen, and his brigade moved into position, connecting with our left at the creek. This movement secured also for two batteries the commanding position in which our first line had been formed. This division having been selected to develop the enemy to the left of the Twenty-third Corps, which was in position to the left and joining General Hazen, this brigade was relieved about 9 a. m. from our works, which we had constructed the day and night previous, by General Cruft's brigade, of General Stanley's division, of the Fourth Corps, and moved about one mile to the left, where it was formed in two lines in rear and support of General Hazen, with Knefler's brigade in rear of this, our formation being in two lines, with the Eighty-ninth Illinois on the right, Thirty-second Indiana on the left, and Fifteenth Wisconsin in the center of the first line; the Fifteenth Ohio on the right, the Forty-ninth Ohio on the left, and Thirty-fifth Illinois in the center of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 115 (search)
ere rendered useless the next morning by the retreat of the enemy. On the night of the 20th I relieved General Harker in front of Kenesaw. The whole night was spent in strengthening the position. Three batteries were disposed along my line. For two days my command lay under the most furious artillery fire that it has ever been my lot to experience. The enemy, from various directions, concentrated their fire on the batteries in my line. The night of the 23d was occupied in relieving General Cruft's brigade, farther to the right, and in fortifying the position. The eight days spent here were busy ones. We were less than 300 yards from the enemy's works, within range of batteries from their positions. Four guns of Captain Dilger's battery were placed in the center of my front line, upon which the enemy's guns converged their fire, but Captain Dilger, with his usual skill, soon silenced them. The enemy during the night changed their smooth-bores for rifle guns, and the next mor
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 124 (search)
a heavy fire of artillery and infantry from their main works. Relieved on the 19th by a detachment of the Seventy-fourth Ohio. Enemy evacuate their works. On the 20th moved with the brigade into a new position in front of and to the right of Kenesaw Mountain, relieving a regiment of the Fourth Corps; threw out skirmishers. On the 22d the Seventy-ninth Regiment relieved the Seventyeighth Pennsylvania, who were on the skirmish line; remained in that position until relieved by a regiment of Cruft's brigade, when we shifted position to the right one mile. On the 24th took up Dosition and remained confronting the enemy until July 2, when our position was again shifted to the left for the purpose of forming a new line; worked all night, and at daylight found that the enemy had evacuated their works. Moved promptly on the 3d in pursuit of the enemy, marching through Marietta, Ga.; halted for a short rest, and then moved forward four miles, where the heavy skirmishing gave evidence that
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 129 (search)
he 23d the Fourteenth Michigan Infantry was ordered to advance and make a demonstration to attract the attention of the enemy while some movement was being made on our right. June 26, about 1 a. m. my command was relieved by General Harrow's division, of the Sixteenth Army Corps, and moved to the right and bivouacked in reserve and rear of Fourth Army Corps. June 27, early this morning relieved General Whitaker's brigade in the trenches and one regiment (Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania) of General Cruft's brigade; the line was taken up under a severe fire from the enemy's line, the Tenth Illinois Infantry losing 1 killed and 8 wounded; remained in same position during the 28th, 29th, and 30th of June, and 1st and 2d of July. July 3, enemy found to have evacuated their works in our front early this morning; the Tenth Illinois Infantry advanced promptly to Marietta and Powder Springs road as a skirmish line; the remaining regiments of the brigade moved to a point just south of Mariett
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
First left Blue Springs at the same hour. General Cruft's brigade (First Brigade, First Division),n the ridge opposite Tunnel Hill at 8.45 a. m. Cruft's brigade, of First Division, was there, General Cruft having communicated with Davis' division, of Palmer's corps, with the Second and Third bradvanced toward the tunnel. At 9.20, while at Cruft's headquarters, we caught a rebel signal messaconnaissance was made at 5 p. m. to dusk, with Cruft's brigade, conducted by General Howard. Develg to Burnt Hickory from our left, and that General Cruft's brigade, of Stanley's division, was ordep. m., General Stanley said that he would send Cruft's brigade as the train guard in the a. m. to Kley's divisions. 8.15 p. m., sent note to General Cruft at Kingston to start back with train at dasent to Major-General Thomas, and he said that Cruft must not move to our old camp, via Owen's Brid depot if no supplies at Etowah. 4 p. m., General Cruft arrived with that part of our train which [8 more...]
nition, the Illinoians were compelled to fall back; and the enemy, with cheers, pressed forward and outflanked them on the right, when the Seventeenth and Twenty-fifth Kentucky, and the Thirty-first and Forty-fourth Indiana regiments, all under Col. Cruft, were brought up to support the failing fortunes of the Union men. An unfortunate mistake, on the part of this reinforcement, led the Twenty-fifth Kentuckians to pour a volley into the ranks of the Thirty-first Illinoians, causing terrible lossth brigade, moved the Eighth Missouri and Eleventh Indiana regiments against the position, on the extreme right of the line, from which the Union troops had been driven, at an earlier hour of the day; and part of the First brigade, commanded by Col. Cruft--embracing the Thirty-first and Forty-fourth Indiana regiments--was moved to his support. The assault was made in two columns; and it was a complete success, the hill was carried by storm; and the enemy was driven into his works, amidst the he
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