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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 4 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for Robinson Crusoe or search for Robinson Crusoe in all documents.

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sometimes had to double up their teams. I attended that school for six weeks, and learned to read with but little difficulty. I remained at home during the autumn, and then it was that our shoemaker gave me the book of all books for a boy, Robinson Crusoe. The question was not whether I wanted to read it, but whether I could be kept from reading it, so as to do the little matters that I ought to do, and was able to do, called in New Hampshire nomenclature, chores. My mother, laying aside hectest sect of Calvin, she thought that I ought not to have so much secular reading without some Christian teaching; and so we struck a bargain that I should learn so many verses in the New Testament if she would help me read so many pages in Robinson Crusoe, she agreeing to explain both to me. My reading, thereupon, was almost continuous, scarcely anything but eating and sleeping intervening. To force me out of doors to take required exercise, she was obliged to send me on errands, and make me