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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 4 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson. You can also browse the collection for Robinson Crusoe or search for Robinson Crusoe in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 1: Cambridge and Newburyport (search)
n have bought the most beautiful of the islands; are going to bring it under cultivation, have a boarding-house for invalids and aesthetic visitors, and do something to civilize the inhabitants of the other islands. It is really quite the Locksley Hall idea to burst all links of habit, etc. He is in high spirits with the plan. Again he wrote in 1849: We had last week a visit from Levi: . . he lives in a house by himself with his man John, a native, inseparable from him — like Robinson Crusoe precisely and very happy. You should have heard his accounts of his cooking and other experiences and our shouts of laughter. He had been down to Watertown to help fit out Jonas [Thaxter] for California! What a nice place for disposing of all odd sticks that is!--all except Levi, perhaps. Later the Higginsons spent several days at the Shoals, where Unitarian clergymen were congregating and where the Reverend John Weiss and his host were making things lively. Meantime little
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 2: the Worcester period (search)
wards quietly said that he had one or two projects of that kind, which would require a great deal of preliminary preparation and on that he was about to enter Thus tranquilly does this man of eighty-six plan his life from month to month. That year Dr. Kane and Dr. Hayes, the Arctic explorers, claimed public attention. February, 1857 . .. Health is the first object, as the worthy Doctor used to say, so I take naps and gymnasium and read the fascinating Dr. Kane. I do believe Robinson Crusoe will have to give place hereafter, and that boys will keep some small edition of Dr. Kane instead of Baron Trench in their school desks. I seldom read of anything which I do not fancy I could have done myself, such is the weakness of our common nature; but here I confess myself distanced, even in fancy. On the other hand, what a dull and unprofitable book is the Letters of Daniel Webster ; no genius or power in it, or charm of any kind except the letters to his farmers, which are qu